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Posts from the ‘Tell About the South’ Category

Tell About the South: Mishio Yamanaka, Tues, April 17 at 12:30 pm

Mishio Yamanaka, a PhD candidate in UNC’s Department of History and the 2017-18 McColl Fellow, will show how Creoles of color in New Orleans achieved the partial desegregation of public schools during Reconstruction and resisted resegregation in 1877. In her dissertation, she argues that public schools catalyzed Creoles’ civil rights debate, as they considered educational opportunities fundamental to racial equality. By examining school records and family histories, her project reveals how Creoles of color forged a community-wide desegregation campaign during the Reconstruction period.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Kimberly Kyser, Thurs, Feb 22 at 12:30 pm — This Event is Full

Talking about table manners is a prickly proposition–and big business in the twenty-first century. Join us for a “proper” southern luncheon with Kimberly Kyser, author of Ticket, a thoroughly modern etiquette book that demystifies the dreaded prissiness of “proper” behavior. Kyser draws on personal experience, historical research, and humor to remind us that social skills—especially table manners—are important and will always be a mainstay of civilized conduct. 

Born in Hollywood and raised in North Carolina, Kimberly Kyser graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B.A. in Art History. She then studied at the Parson’s School of Design, New York, and later earned a B.F.A. in painting at the Atlanta College of Art (now SCAD). After a career in the fine arts with exhibitions in the Southeast and works in private and public collections in the US and abroad, she opened Kimberly Kyser, Inc. to design and manufacture special occasion clothing. She has 30 original pieces on display as part of the 20th century fashion design collection at the Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte.

This event is at maximum capacity, but we hope to offer another one like it soon.

Tell About the South: Stephen Mandravelis, Tues, Feb 6 at 12:30 pm

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Javier Arce Nazario, Thurs, Jan 25 at 12:30 pm

“‘Besides being water of good quality, it is very good water’: Redefining Public Health Metrics of Water Quality”

Professor Javier Arce Nazario is an Associate Professor in the Geography Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. His research program has focused on the biophysical and social components of the Puerto Rican landscapes, and how they affect water quality and adaptability to extreme precipitation events. His interests specifically include understanding how watershed composition impacts water quality in the tropics, assessing the economic impact of extreme precipitation events, and exploring how community water management can be viewed through the lens of environmental justice. He is also interested in using historical orthophotography as an outreach tool for education and community involvement in water quality and environmental concerns.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be served. Special thanks to our co-sponsors, the Latina/o Studies Program at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Tell About the South: Karida Brown, Tues, Dec 5 at 12:30 pm

In this talk, Brown will introduce her new research project, The Subaltern School, in which she undertakes a global socio-historical examination of segregated schooling. In the spirit of the CSAS colloquia, she will “tell about two Souths”: that of the U.S. South and that of South Africa, through their shared struggles over how we “do” history in this integrated, “post-racial” era. Focusing on the current battles over commemorative monuments on college campuses, she will share insights from the #RhodesMustFall movement in South Africa to open a discussion about the current protests over Silent Sam.

Karida Brown is a visiting scholar in UNC’s Department of Sociology. She received her PhD in Sociology from Brown University, and her dissertation received the 2017 American Sociological Association Best Dissertation Award. For more information about the Eastern Kentucky African American Migration Project (EKAAMP), click here.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be served.