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Posts from the ‘Hutchins Lectures’ Category

Hutchins Conversation: Jason Oliver Chang, Tues, Mar 20 at 4:30 pm

Anti-Chinese Racism and the Making of the Mexican Mestizo

Jason Oliver Chang is Assistant Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. At UConn he is an affiliated faculty member with the Maritime Studies Institute as well as the Institute of Latinx, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies and the Associate Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. In 2010 Jason earned his PhD in Comparative Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico, 1880-1940 (University of Illinois Press, 2017) and co-author of Asian America: A Primary Source Reader (Yale University Press, 2017). He has published articles in the Journal for Asian American Studies, the Pacific Historical Review, and the Journal of Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures in the Americas. Jason’s current work rewrites Asian American history from the perspective of Chinese, South Asian, and Filipino sailors to think how racial formations work at sea.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the University Room at Hyde Hall. Special thanks to our co-sponsors: the Department of American Studies, the Institute for the Study of the Americas, the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Asia Center, the Chinese Undergraduate Student Association, the Carolina Hispanic Association, the Latina/o Studies Program, the Center for Global Initiatives, and the Institute for Arts and Humanities.

Hutchins Conversation: Lisa McKeithan, Tues, March 6 at 4:30 pm

Health and the Humanities in Practice: Using a Liberal Arts Approach to Rural Health Challenges in North Carolina

Lisa McKeithan (far right) and the CommWell Health team accept an award for their work

Lisa McKeithan, MS, CRC, is Director and HIV/AIDS Researcher at CommWell Health Clinics in Dunn, North Carolina, an award-winning not-for-profit Federally Qualified Health Center. McKeithan is Director of CommWell Health’s NC-REACH program, which serves patients who are both HIV-positive and homeless. The National Rural Health Association named it Outstanding Program of the Year, and McKeithan the Outstanding Educator of the Year. In conversation with Dr. Martha King, Teaching Assistant Professor of Medical Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill, McKeithan will discuss the ways in which the humanities and social sciences shape her approach to healthcare in the rural South.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall.

Hutchins Lecture: Robert Gipe, Thurs, March 9 at 4:30 pm

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“Storytellers and Sociopaths: Thoughts on How We Define Reality from Post-Obama Appalachia”

This lecture will explore connections between the rich storytelling tradition, grinding economic challenges, hard political choices, despair, and hope experienced by people in the southeast Kentucky coalfields. Gipe will read from his previously published fiction, and he will address the creation of the Higher Ground community performances, a series of oral history-based theater events in Harlan County, Kentucky which have been running from 2003 to the present.

Gipe_TrampolineRobert Gipe is the author of the award-winning illustrated novel Trampoline (Ohio University Press, 2015). His short story “Dreadful Crash” appeared in the 21C Fiction Issue of Southern Cultures (Fall 2016). Gipe teaches at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, where he directs the Appalachian Studies program. He has worked previously as a pickle packer, a forklift driver, and a DJ.

This lecture, to be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: Julie Reed, Thurs, Feb 16 at 4:30 pm

“What is the real basis of a public enterprise?” The Cherokee Nation and the Social Safety Net

reedIn this lecture, Reed will discuss why nineteenth-century Cherokee people chose to surrender aspects of their holistic system of care for others rooted within a matrilineal clan system and governed by local community obligations and clan responsibilities that stretched across towns in favor of nationally administered social services by the Cherokee Nation to individual citizens. This shift ultimately resulted in the creation of an orphanage, a prison, and a facility for the (dis)abled and mentally ill in the period after the Civil War.  Reed will share how Cherokee people evaluated the quality of their institutions and the conditions that led them to study and critique the social policies of states and the larger United States.reed-serving-the-nation

Julie Reed is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Her book Serving the Nation: Cherokee Sovereignty and Social Welfare, 1800-1907 was published by the University of Oklahoma Press in 2016. This lecture will be held in the Pleasants Family Room at Wilson Library. The lecture is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: E. Patrick Johnson, Thurs, Jan 26 at 4:30 pm

In this lecture, titled “The Beekeeper: Collecting Oral Histories of Black Southern Queer Women,” Johnson discussed some methodological challenges of being a man conducting research on women as well as addressing some topics that he found to be common among many of the women he interviewed. He also performed excerpts from the oral histories.

epjE. Patrick Johnson is Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity, and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History. He is the editor of Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood (Michigan UP, 2013) and co-editor (with Mae G. Henderson) of Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology and (with Ramon Rivera-Servera) of solo/black/woman: scripts, interviews, and essays and Blacktino Queer Performance (Duke UP, 2016).

This lecture was co-sponsored by the Department of Communication and the LGBTQ Center.