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Posts from the ‘Tell About the South’ Category

Tell About the South: Chuck Reece, Fri, Feb 13 at 12:30 pm

Chuck ReeceJoin us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Chuck Reece. Together with three partners, Reece launched The Bitter Southerner, a weekly web magazine, in 2013 to tell the stories of a new(er) South. The editors have built a tremendous community around the magazine and its social media outlets, bringing together tens of thousands of readers and followers around the world. The Bitter Southerner‘s new approach to media has garnered the praise of many, including widely known journalists such as NPR’s Michelle Norris. The publication envisions “a South whose people are known for their creation, innovation, and forward thinking as much as they are known for their grace, hospitality, and conviviality.”

In his earlier life, Reece served as communications director to former Georgia Governor Zell Miller before moving into the world of corporate communications, serving as manager of global internal communications for The Coca-Cola Company. Reece returned to journalism because he believes that “the voices of the South’s smartest and most creative people are heard too faintly these days, and are too often discounted because of stereotypes in the dominant national media. Our goal is to raise those voices and, by so doing, to contribute to raising the fortunes of a changing South and its people.”

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Emilio del Valle Escalante, Wednesday, March 25 at 12:30 pm

EmilioWhat role have Maya writers and their literatures played in the affirmation of indigenous cultural identity and the struggle for indigenous rights and self-determination in Guatemala since the 1960s? Please join us for a lunchtime discussion with Emilio del Valle Escalante, Assistant Professor of Spanish in UNC’s Department of Romance Studies, on “Maya Literary Resurgence in Guatemala.”

Professor Escalante will answer the question above by offering a critical discussion of the poetry of Kaqchikel Maya authors Francisco Morales Santos and Luis de Lión. Given that the context of the 1960s defines the beginning of a 36-year-long civil war, he argues that Morales Santos and Lión respond to that experience as well as the interest of the Guatemalan left in incorporating the Maya population into the armed struggle. These Kaqchikel authors embrace the socialist ideal proposed by the Guatemalan left while using the left to propose and build a political space to articulate their own Maya national liberation; that is, their poetry speaks of revolution and socialism as well as Maya cultural/national vindication and decolonization.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Frank R. Baumgartner, Tuesday, October 28 at 12:30 pm

BaumgartnerPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Frank R. Baumgartner, the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.  Baumgartner is co-author of The Decline of the Death Penalty and the Discovery of Innocence, and since coming to Carolina he has researched the death penalty’s demise nationally as well as in North Carolina.  With colleagues Isaac Unah (Political Science) and Seth Kotch (American Studies), he is working on a book tentatively titled A Deadly Symbol: Race and Capital Punishment in North Carolina. Baumgartner also teaches a course on Race, Innocence, and the End of the Death Penalty (POLI 203) which currently has 240 students enrolled.  Associated with that is a speakers series on the death penalty with eight speakers including the family of Troy Davis, several exonerated inmates from North Carolina and their attorneys, and others; these events are open to the public throughout the fall semester.

Baumgartner will speak about the racial aspects of North Carolina’s death penalty and the relevance of the Racial Justice Act’s passage (2009), revision (2011) and demise (2013).  These events make clear that the politics of race, innocence, and the death penalty remain fundamental in our state.  At the same time, use of the punishment has never been very common and in recent years has declined so much that it has become almost entirely symbolic (no one has been executed since 2006, and only 1 death sentence has been handed down, state-wide, since 2011).  But what a powerful symbol it is.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Sharon Holland, Tuesday, October 21 at 12:30 pm

slj_coverSharon P. Holland (Editor), along with Managing Editor Kathleen Crosby, will speak about their work transitioning SLJ (The Southern Literary Journal) from the Department of English & Comparative Literature to UNC’s Department of American Studies. Taking a very well-known journal from its home in literary studies to a journal with interdisciplinary content is no small feat, and the editors will outline their process as well as sharing their thoughts on Southern Studies, the publishing industry, and contemporary scholarship in American Studies, more broadly.

Holland

Holland is a graduate of Princeton University (1986) and holds a PhD in English and African American Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1992). She is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and (Black) Subjectivity  (Duke UP, 2000), which won the Lora Romero First Book Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA) in 2002. She is also co-author of a collection of trans-Atlantic Afro-Native criticism with Professor Tiya Miles (American Culture, UM, Ann Arbor) entitled Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country (Duke UP, 2006). Professor Holland is also responsible for bringing a feminist classic, The Queen is in the Garbage by Lila Karp to the attention of The Feminist Press (Summer 2007) for publication (2007). She is the author of The Erotic Life of Racism (Duke UP, 2012), a theoretical project that explores the intersection of Critical Race, Feminist, and Queer Theory. She is also at work on the final draft of another book project entitled simply, “little black girl.” You can see her work on food, writing and all things equestrian on her blog, theprofessorstable.wordpress.com. She is currently at work on a new project, “Perishment”: an investigation of the human/animal distinction and the place of discourse on blackness within that discussion. She is presently Professor in and Associate Chair of the Department of American Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

This event is co-sponsored by UNC Press. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Kathleen DuVal, Tuesday, September 23 at 12:30 pm

Kathleen DuValPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Kathleen DuVal, Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. DuVal’s talk, titled “Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution,”  focuses on the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. Based on her research for a forthcoming book by the same title, “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences, including incorporation into a rising American republic.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.