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Posts from the ‘Tell About the South’ Category

Tell About the South: Evan Faulkenbury, Tues, Oct 27 at 12:30 pm

Evan Faulkenbury photoThe money to pay for the Civil Rights Movement had to come from somewhere. In this talk, Evan Faulkenbury will tell the story of the Voter Education Project (VEP) and how philanthropic foundations paid for and influenced the course of the movement during the 1960s. The VEP solicited grants from foundations, then dispersed the money to hundreds of grassroots voter registration campaigns across the eleven states of the Old Confederacy. With these grants, ranging from $200 to $20,000, local civil rights movements sprang up across the South, coalescing into the broader African American freedom struggle. The VEP was the behind-the-scenes engine of the Civil Rights Movement, empowering local activists to register people, to challenge Jim Crow at the polls, and to revolutionize southern and national politics.

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Faulkenbury, a PhD candidate in History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Field Scholar with the Southern Oral History Program. This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Evan Faulkenbury Image

Tell About the South: Rob Shapard, Tues, April 21 at 12:30 pm

Rob Shapard copyPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Rob Shapard, a doctoral student in U.S. History and 2014-15 McColl Fellow at CSAS. In his talk, Calculating Eye and Rough Hand: Turning Longleaf into Board Feet and Sawdust,” Shapard will describe the perspective of one sawmilling firm, the Louisiana Central Lumber Company, toward the old-growth Louisiana longleaf pine forests that it felled and milled into lumber in the early twentieth century. The language that the company used to describe longleaf and other trees, a kind of “lumber lexicon,” reveals this perspective and helps to explain the company’s effectiveness in making lumber from longleaf. The topic is one aspect of Shapard’s doctoral dissertation on attitudes toward longleaf pine across the American South. Shapard is a native of the erstwhile textile town of Griffin, Georgia, a former journalist, and a student/scholar of environmental history and oral history.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Elizabeth Engelhardt, Tues, March 31 at 12:30 pm

EngelhardtAn often-repeated line about the southern food story is that restaurant culture was delayed in the U.S. South relative to the rest of the nation. Even Kim Severson’s recent New York Times profile of female chefs in North Carolina is a version of the argument. Concurrently, Elizabeth Engelhardt made the argument in her most recent book, A Mess of Greens, that we should study the foods and tables in the middle—beyond the fetishized plantation tables of excess or the differently romanticized tables of black and white poverty—to understand the daily decisions that connect past and future, processed and home grown, regional and national, individual and structural of southern food. This discussion, titled “Boardinghouse Space: Rewriting Southern Food Studies,” proposes that the public, middling restaurant table has been hiding in plain sight: the understudied, undercounted, but ever-present boardinghouse table in southern communities large and small.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Emilio del Valle Escalante, Wed, March 25 at 12:30 pm

EmilioWhat role have Maya writers and their literatures played in the affirmation of indigenous cultural identity and the struggle for indigenous rights and self-determination in Guatemala since the 1960s? Please join us for a lunchtime discussion with Emilio del Valle Escalante, Associate Professor of Spanish in UNC’s Department of Romance Studies, on “Maya Literary Resurgence in Guatemala.”

Professor Escalante will answer the question above by offering a critical discussion of the poetry of Kaqchikel Maya authors Francisco Morales Santos and Luis de Lión. Given that the context of the 1960s defines the beginning of a 36-year-long civil war, he argues that Morales Santos and Lión respond to that experience as well as the interest of the Guatemalan left in incorporating the Maya population into the armed struggle. These Kaqchikel authors embrace the socialist ideal proposed by the Guatemalan left while using the left to propose and build a political space to articulate their own Maya national liberation; that is, their poetry speaks of revolution and socialism as well as Maya cultural/national vindication and decolonization.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Chuck Reece, Fri, Feb 13 at 12:30 pm

Chuck ReeceJoin us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Chuck Reece. Together with three partners, Reece launched The Bitter Southerner, a weekly web magazine, in 2013 to tell the stories of a new(er) South. The editors have built a tremendous community around the magazine and its social media outlets, bringing together tens of thousands of readers and followers around the world. The Bitter Southerner‘s new approach to media has garnered the praise of many, including widely known journalists such as NPR’s Michelle Norris. The publication envisions “a South whose people are known for their creation, innovation, and forward thinking as much as they are known for their grace, hospitality, and conviviality.”

In his earlier life, Reece served as communications director to former Georgia Governor Zell Miller before moving into the world of corporate communications, serving as manager of global internal communications for The Coca-Cola Company. Reece returned to journalism because he believes that “the voices of the South’s smartest and most creative people are heard too faintly these days, and are too often discounted because of stereotypes in the dominant national media. Our goal is to raise those voices and, by so doing, to contribute to raising the fortunes of a changing South and its people.”

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.