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Posts from the ‘Hutchins Lectures’ Category

Hutchins Lecture by Waldo E. Martin Jr., Thurs, March 19 at 4:30 pm

Please join us for the final Hutchins Lecture of the 2014-15 academic year, as Waldo E. Martin Jr. addresses “Reaping the Whirlwind”: The Contested History of the Black Panther Party. This lecture will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039 Graham Memorial Hall).

Black Against EmpireThis talk will draw upon the making and reception of Martin’s co-authored (with Joshua Bloom) work Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party (U of California P, 2013).  The history of the Black Panther Party is a minefield, but Martin will discuss key enduring historical controversies surrounding how the party has been perceived and conceptualized over time by various constituencies, including former party members, scholars, and ideologues.

Central to this presentation will be an analysis of two questions. First, he will discuss why the party was important in its own time and the party’s enduring historical importance. Second, he will argue for the centrality of the party’s radical politics in our continuing efforts to historicize and understand the party.

WaldoWaldo E. Martin Jr. is the Alexander F. & May T. Morrison Professor of American History & Citizenship at the University of California, Berkeley. He has authored, co-authored, and co-edited a host of authoritative works on African American History and Culture, with a special focus on the Civil Rights Movement. He is currently Co-Editor (with Patricia A. Sullivan) of the John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture at UNC Press, and he recently published (with Deborah Gray White & Mia Bay) Freedom on My Mind: A History of African Americans with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013).

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture by Sophie White, Thurs, Feb 19 at 4:30 pm


sophiewhiteIn her lecture, “Beyond the Slave Narrative,” Sophie White showcases the judicial testimony of enslaved Africans in criminal trials in French colonial Louisiana. Drawing on her current research project, White locates the verbal and non-verbal stories which enslaved individuals, forced into a global African diaspora, sought somehow to narrate. Reading past the details of the criminal cases, and interspersing her analysis with excerpts from their testimonies, she focuses on individual slaves’s subjectivity as conveyed through their inflections and uses of imagery, their choice of words and their silences. This lecture will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039 Graham Memorial Hall).

Wild Frenchmen

Sophie White is Associate Professor of American Studies, Africana Studies, and History at the University of Notre Dame. She describes herself as an “historian of early America with an interdisciplinary focus on cultural encounters between Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans, and a commitment to Atlantic and global research perspectives.” Professor White is the author of Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana (University of Pennsylvania Press, McNeil Center for Early American Studies series, 2012), which demonstrates that material culture–especially dress–was central to the elaboration of discourses about race in French colonial Louisiana. Her current book project, “Voices of the African Diaspora Within and Beyond the Atlantic World,” is centered on the analysis of an extraordinary body of testimony by enslaved Africans in colonial Louisiana and beyond. Both book projects have been supported by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: Leslie Bow, Thurs, Jan 29 at 4:30 pm


Bow_Leslie_port10_8556Where did the Asian sit on the segregated bus? Drawing from her book, ‘Partly Colored': Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, Leslie Bow traces narratives that attempted to reconcile Asian Americans to segregation’s distinction between black and white.

Investigating the ways in which racially “in-between” subjects and communities were understood within the South, Bow locates Asian American representation in visual culture and memoir as a site of cultural anxiety and negotiation.  What she uncovers is not so much an alternative account of white supremacy, but a genealogy of repressed dissonance that has consequence for the ways that we remember the Jim Crow era and its legacy. This lecture will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039 Graham Memorial Hall).

Partly_ColoredLeslie Bow is Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the author of ‘Partly Colored’ (NYU Press, 2010) and Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion (Princeton UP, 2001), as well as the editor of the four-volume collection Asian American Feminisms (Routledge, 2012). Bow has served as Director of Asian American Studies, on the editorial board of American Literature, and on the Executive Committee of the Modern Language Association (MLA). Her current book project examines fantasy portrayals of race.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture by CheFarmer Matthew Raiford, Thursday, November 13 at 4:30 pm


In our final Hutchins Lecture of Fall 2014, titled “Sustainable, Organic, & Slow: Restoring the Legacy of Black Family Farms,” Chef & Farmer Matthew Raiford will discuss returning home after a quarter of a century to help restore his family farm. Gilliard Farms has been in Raiford’s family since 1874 and is a Georgia Centennial Family Farm. But what does it mean to be a modern-day farmer in the 21st century and still be sustainable, organic, and slow?

Chef Matthew Raiford in the Organic Garden.  Little St. Simons Island, GA.CheFarmer Raiford is currently the Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Culinary Arts at the College of Coastal Georgia. He holds a Bachelor’s of Professional Studies degree in Culinary Arts from The Culinary Institute of America and a certificate in Ecological Horticulture from UC-Santa Cruz. Raiford is a member of Slow Food USA and a Steering Committee Member for Slow Meat. He previously served as Executive Chef of Haute Catering in Washington, D.C., where he was a preferred caterer for the House of Representatives, the National Defense University, the National Archives, the Pentagon Conference Center and Library, and the Canadian Embassy, where he oversaw a staff of 125 cooking over 2000 meals a day.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039) in Graham Memorial Hall. Light refreshments will be provided.

Hutchins Lecture: Rebecca J. Scott, Tuesday, October 14 at 4:30 pm


rebecca scottProfessor Scott’s Hutchins Lecture, titled “Tracing Atlantic Revolutions: One Family’s Itinerary,” will address the research that went into her recent book Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (Harvard UP, 2012; paperback, August 2014), which traces one family’s interaction with law and official documents across five generations.  The story begins in West Africa with the enslavement of a woman named Rosalie, then follows her to the French Caribbean at the time of the Haitian Revolution. Rosalie’s daughter Elisabeth later settled in Louisiana, but in the face of hostility to free persons of color, the family migrated to France. Two of Elisabeth’s sons then returned to Louisiana to become equal-rights activists during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Piecing together this family’s history helps to place Reconstruction in the southern United States into a transnational perspective, with threads continuing into 20th-century Europe. This lecture will be held at the Pleasants Room in UNC’s Wilson Library.

Rebecca J. Scott is the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. At the Law School, she teaches a course on civil rights and the boundaries of citizenship in historical perspective, as well as a seminar on the law in slavery and freedom. Freedom Papers has been awarded the 2012 Albert Beveridge Book Award in American History and the James Rawley Book Prize in Atlantic History, both from the American Historical Association. The book also has been awarded the 2013 Chinard Prize from the Society for French Historical Studies and the Institut Français d’Amerique. Scott received an AB from Radcliffe College, an MPhil in economic history from the London School of Economics, and a PhD in history from Princeton University. She has held the Guggenheim Fellowship and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.