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Posts tagged ‘Native American’

Art Reception: Native Veteran Story Quilts

Join us at the Center as we launch our Fall 2017 art exhibit, featuring story quilts based on the deployed experiences of Native American military veterans. Inspired by oral history interviews with veterans from each of North Carolina’s eight state- and federally-recognized tribes, these quilts are artifacts of lived experience and material culture from the American South. Their stories from World War II through ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan reflect the strength and complications of patriotism, as well as the struggles that sometimes continue after leaving the combat zone.

 

 

 

 

In addition to comments by Project Director Karen Harley, a member of the Haliwa-Saponi Indian tribe, the opening reception will include performances by Native musicians and excerpts from oral history interviews. This exhibit is made possible with funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The reception is co-sponsored by UNC’s American Indian Center and Department of American Studies.

Hutchins Lecture: Julie Reed on Social Services in the Cherokee Nation

“What is the real basis of a public enterprise?” The Cherokee Nation and the Social Safety Net

reedIn this lecture, Reed will discuss why nineteenth-century Cherokee people chose to surrender aspects of their holistic system of care for others rooted within a matrilineal clan system and governed by local community obligations and clan responsibilities that stretched across towns in favor of nationally administered social services by the Cherokee Nation to individual citizens. This shift ultimately resulted in the creation of an orphanage, a prison, and a facility for the (dis)abled and mentally ill in the period after the Civil War.  Reed will share how Cherokee people evaluated the quality of their institutions and the conditions that led them to study and critique the social policies of states and the larger United States.

reed-serving-the-nationJulie Reed is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Her book Serving the Nation: Cherokee Sovereignty and Social Welfare, 1800-1907 was published by the University of Oklahoma Press in 2016. This lecture will be held in the Pleasants Family Room at Wilson Library. The lecture is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: Gregory D. Smithers on the Cherokee Diaspora

Cherokee-DiasporaThe Cherokee are one of the largest Native American tribes in the United States, with more than three hundred thousand people across the country claiming tribal membership and nearly one million people internationally professing to have at least one Cherokee Indian ancestor. In this revealing history of Cherokee migration and resettlement, Professor Gregory Smithers uncovers the origins of the Cherokee diaspora and explores how communities and individuals have negotiated their Cherokee identities, even when geographically removed from the Cherokee Nation headquartered in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Beginning in the eighteenth century, the author transports the reader back in time to tell the poignant story of the Cherokee people migrating throughout North America, including their forced exile along the infamous Trail of Tears (1838–39). Smithers tells a remarkable story of courage, cultural innovation, and resilience, exploring the importance of migration and removal, land and tradition, culture and language in defining what it has meant to be Cherokee for a widely scattered people.

IMG_2380Gregory D. Smithers is an Associate Professor of Native American History at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of The Cherokee Diaspora(Yale University Press, 2015) and Slave Breeding: Sex, Violence, and Memory in African American History  (University Press of Florida, 2013), and the co-editor (with Brooke N. Newman) of Native Diasporas (University of Nebraska Press, 2014).

This lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Kyle T. Mays on Indigenous Hip Hop

Rebel-Music

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion titled “From Red Power to Hip Hop: The Urban Indigenous Experience in Postwar America.” Indigenous people and urban spaces are often rendered incompatible in both historical and contemporary scholarship. In this line of thinking, Native people are “pre-modern” while cities are “modern,” thus Native people are outside of modernity. And yet, they have always been in cities and engaged with urban culture. They were influenced by and helped shape urban culture for the last several decades in significant ways.  Crossing the late 20th and early 21st centuries, this talk explores the links between the Red Power movement and the most significant cultural movement since that time: the emergence of Hip Hop in Indigenous North America. Two questions frame my talk. What role did urban culture play in the shaping of the Red Power movement? What is the link between the Red Power movement and Indigenous Hip Hop today? Using Critical Indigenous Studies frameworks, this talk argues that Native people, long fighting the colonial baggage of invisibility, have used urban spaces and cultures to help assert their humanity as modern Indigenous people in postwar America.

kylemaysKyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Chippewa) is a transdisciplinary scholar of modern U.S. history, urban history, indigenous studies, and comparative ethnic studies. As a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at UNC-Chapel Hill, he is currently working on two projects. The first is a revised version of his dissertation, titled Indigenous Detroit: Indigeneity, Race, and Gender in the Construction of the Modern Motor City, which analyzes the role of indigeneity in the construction of 20th century Detroit. The second is a book-length manuscript titled Hip Hop Beats, Indigenous Rhymes: Modernity and Hip Hop in Indigenous North America, which is currently under contract with SUNY Press.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

UNC Process Series: And So We Walked

AndSoWeWalkedIn this performance with the Process Series, Cherokee actor and writer DeLanna Studi explores the enduring impact of the Trail of Tears on contemporary communities using research, interviews, and her own family’s experience. Along with her father and a documentarian, DelannaStudi retraced the steps of her ancestors from their homestead in Murphy, North Carolina to their present home near Tahlequah, Oklahoma. “While the Trail of Tears is a defining moment in our Cherokee history, it does not define who we are,” says Studi.

Studi will spend a month in residency at UNC-Chapel Hill turning her firsthand research on the Trail into an original dramatic work. Corey Madden of UNC School of the Arts directs this intimate yet communal journey of loss and renewal. This program is co-sponsored by the American Indian Center, the Southern Oral History Program, and CSAS. Both shows, which are free and open to the public, will begin at 8:00 pm in the Black Box Theatre in Swain Hall.