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Posts from the ‘Literature’ Category

Follow Along on our Literary Tar Heel Tour!

Click here to access the virtual tour. 

Monique Truong on Food, Literature, and Immigration, Fri, Oct 28 at 12:00 pm

truongJoin us in the Hitchcock Room at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center as we welcome Monique Truong back to the Old North State. Her lecture is titled “Writing Plenty / Writing Hunger / Writing North Carolina.” The talk will begin with Truong’s first meal in the U.S., eaten in a refugee relocation camp in 1975, and will explore the “magical thinking” relationship that she formed toward food during her girlhood in Boiling Springs, NC.

Born in Saigon, South Vietnam in 1968, Monique Truong is a novelist and essayist based in Brooklyn. She is the author of the national bestseller The Book of Salt (2003) and Bitter in the Mouth (2010). Her novel The Sweetest Fruits is forthcoming from Viking Books. Translated into 14 languages, her novels have garnered her a Guggenheim Fellowship, the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, and the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, among other honors. She is currently the Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College, CUNY. A graduate of Yale University and Columbia University School of Law, Truong is also an intellectual property attorney.

She is also a contributor to the forthcoming 21C Fiction Issue of Southern Cultures, which you can preview here.

bitterinthemouthThis lecture is co-sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, the Department of English and Comparative Literature, the Carolina Asia Center, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Institute for Arts and Humanities, the Food For All campus theme, and Southern Cultures, as well as UNC Libraries’ North Carolina Collection and Southern Historical Collection.

Co-sponsored event: “One Noble Journey: A Box Marked Freedom,” Sun, Feb 14 at 3:00 pm

In celebration of Black History Month, the Friday Center proudly presents a free theatrical performance presented by dramatic artist Mike Wiley on Sunday, February 14 at 3:00 pm.

Noble JourneyHis one-man play, One Noble Journey, tells the story of Henry “Box” Brown, an African American born into slavery, who overcomes seemingly insurmountable odds to gain a life of freedom. After the death of his first master, Henry’s family was torn apart and parceled out to various beneficiaries of the estate. Eventually Henry married and had children, only to have his wife and children sold to a new owner and never seen again. This devastating incident was Brown’s breaking point. He devised an ingenious escape plan—sealing himself in a wooden box for shipment to friends and freedom in Philadelphia. Although he was not subjected to physical violence, Henry’s story, as the basis of the play, demonstrates that the cruelty of slavery was just as devastating to the heart as it could be to the body. One Noble Journey offers a powerful lesson of freedom, faith, and the triumph of the human spirit.

Admission is free, open to the public, and appropriate for all ages. Advance registration is requested: call 866-441-3683 or email fridaycenter@unc.edu.

Italy and the American South: Seba Pezzani, Friday, October 9 at 2:00 pm

DSC_7076Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum for the next installment of “What’s Up Down South?” hosted by William R. Ferris. Ferris will be joined by translator and blues musician Seba Pezzani for an afternoon concert.

Pezanni translated Ferris’s Blues From the Delta into its Italian edition, Il Blues del Delta, and draws his own musical inspiration from the American South. For more than 30 years, Pezanni has toured extensively, playing gigs in the U.S., Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, Iceland, and Italy.

SC App Launch & Picnic, Thurs, July 9 at 5:30 pm

Summer2015coverTo celebrate the Summer 2015 issue release from Southern Cultures, we’re having a beach picnic–right here in Chapel Hill! The new issue features the Ali-Quarry fight in Atlanta, contested stereotypes of southern motherhood, Civil War novels by Vietnam vets, lesbian print culture in North Carolina, and the UNC Student Strike of 1970–plus Bulgarian Faulkner, gorilla stories, thwarted lynchings, and a circus cemetery in “Little Dixie.” We’ll also unveil the new Southern Cultures app from UNC Press, which allows readers to access our award-winning content on the go.

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Join us at the Love House for a summer picnic, comments by John Sherer, and fantastic beach music by The Legacy Motown Revue! This event is free and open to the public.