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Posts from the ‘Literature’ Category

Sacred Spaces Art Reception, Thurs, Feb 5 at 5:30 pm

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please join us at the Center as we unveil our Spring 2015 art exhibit, “Sacred Spaces: A Look Inside the Home of Harlem Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer.”

These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. In addition to a performance by local musicians from the Durham Symphony Orchestra, the reception will include remarks by Professor Greene, photographer John M. Hall, and Spencer’s granddaughter, Shaun Spencer-Hester, who currently serves as curator for the Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum. North Carolina poet Jeffery Beam will read a small selection from Spencer’s work. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This event, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibit

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please stop by the Center and check out our Spring 2015 art exhibit. These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This exhibit, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public.

Hutchins Lecture: Leslie Bow, Thurs, Jan 29 at 4:30 pm

Bow_Leslie_port10_8556Where did the Asian sit on the segregated bus? Drawing from her book, ‘Partly Colored': Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, Leslie Bow traces narratives that attempted to reconcile Asian Americans to segregation’s distinction between black and white.

Investigating the ways in which racially “in-between” subjects and communities were understood within the South, Bow locates Asian American representation in visual culture and memoir as a site of cultural anxiety and negotiation.  What she uncovers is not so much an alternative account of white supremacy, but a genealogy of repressed dissonance that has consequence for the ways that we remember the Jim Crow era and its legacy. This lecture will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039 Graham Memorial Hall).

Partly_ColoredLeslie Bow is Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the author of ‘Partly Colored’ (NYU Press, 2010) and Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion (Princeton UP, 2001), as well as the editor of the four-volume collection Asian American Feminisms (Routledge, 2012). Bow has served as Director of Asian American Studies, on the editorial board of American Literature, and on the Executive Committee of the Modern Language Association (MLA). Her current book project examines fantasy portrayals of race.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Sharon Holland, Tuesday, October 21 at 12:30 pm

slj_coverSharon P. Holland (Editor), along with Managing Editor Kathleen Crosby, will speak about their work transitioning SLJ (The Southern Literary Journal) from the Department of English & Comparative Literature to UNC’s Department of American Studies. Taking a very well-known journal from its home in literary studies to a journal with interdisciplinary content is no small feat, and the editors will outline their process as well as sharing their thoughts on Southern Studies, the publishing industry, and contemporary scholarship in American Studies, more broadly.

Holland

Holland is a graduate of Princeton University (1986) and holds a PhD in English and African American Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1992). She is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and (Black) Subjectivity  (Duke UP, 2000), which won the Lora Romero First Book Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA) in 2002. She is also co-author of a collection of trans-Atlantic Afro-Native criticism with Professor Tiya Miles (American Culture, UM, Ann Arbor) entitled Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country (Duke UP, 2006). Professor Holland is also responsible for bringing a feminist classic, The Queen is in the Garbage by Lila Karp to the attention of The Feminist Press (Summer 2007) for publication (2007). She is the author of The Erotic Life of Racism (Duke UP, 2012), a theoretical project that explores the intersection of Critical Race, Feminist, and Queer Theory. She is also at work on the final draft of another book project entitled simply, “little black girl.” You can see her work on food, writing and all things equestrian on her blog, theprofessorstable.wordpress.com. She is currently at work on a new project, “Perishment”: an investigation of the human/animal distinction and the place of discourse on blackness within that discussion. She is presently Professor in and Associate Chair of the Department of American Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

This event is co-sponsored by UNC Press. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Register now for a free online course with William R. Ferris

A new, free, six-week online course that explores the stories, music and art of the American South will be offered Oct. 13 to Nov. 28, developed and taught by the Center’s Senior Associate Director, William R. Ferris, in conjunction with the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education.


About the Course:

This course explores the stories, music, and art of the American South and considers how they serve as a window on the region’s history and culture. We will see how the region’s distinctive sense of place defines music and literature in each generation. From small farms to urban neighborhoods, from the region itself to more distant worlds of the southern diaspora, stories, music, and art chronicle places and the people who live within them.

Our course explores the nature of oral tradition and how its study can provide a methodology for understanding Southern literature. We will discuss Southern artists and photographers and will show how the history and traditions of the South influences their work. We will consider the work of Southern Writers and discuss how they utilize specific stories, music, and art as a structure for literary forms such as the novel and the short story. Lastly, we look into the rich history of southern music and its roots in work chants, fife and drum, and one-strand on the wall musics.

Sign Up:
For more information, and to register for free, visit: www.coursera.org/course/south.