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Posts from the ‘Literature’ Category

Co-sponsored event: “One Noble Journey: A Box Marked Freedom,” Sun, Feb 14 at 3:00 pm

In celebration of Black History Month, the Friday Center proudly presents a free theatrical performance presented by dramatic artist Mike Wiley on Sunday, February 14 at 3:00 pm.

Noble JourneyHis one-man play, One Noble Journey, tells the story of Henry “Box” Brown, an African American born into slavery, who overcomes seemingly insurmountable odds to gain a life of freedom. After the death of his first master, Henry’s family was torn apart and parceled out to various beneficiaries of the estate. Eventually Henry married and had children, only to have his wife and children sold to a new owner and never seen again. This devastating incident was Brown’s breaking point. He devised an ingenious escape plan—sealing himself in a wooden box for shipment to friends and freedom in Philadelphia. Although he was not subjected to physical violence, Henry’s story, as the basis of the play, demonstrates that the cruelty of slavery was just as devastating to the heart as it could be to the body. One Noble Journey offers a powerful lesson of freedom, faith, and the triumph of the human spirit.

Admission is free, open to the public, and appropriate for all ages. Advance registration is requested: call 866-441-3683 or email fridaycenter@unc.edu.

Italy and the American South: Seba Pezzani, Friday, October 9 at 2:00 pm

DSC_7076Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum for the next installment of “What’s Up Down South?” hosted by William R. Ferris. Ferris will be joined by translator and blues musician Seba Pezzani for an afternoon concert.

Pezanni translated Ferris’s Blues From the Delta into its Italian edition, Il Blues del Delta, and draws his own musical inspiration from the American South. For more than 30 years, Pezanni has toured extensively, playing gigs in the U.S., Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, Iceland, and Italy.

SC App Launch & Picnic, Thurs, July 9 at 5:30 pm

Summer2015coverTo celebrate the Summer 2015 issue release from Southern Cultures, we’re having a beach picnic–right here in Chapel Hill! The new issue features the Ali-Quarry fight in Atlanta, contested stereotypes of southern motherhood, Civil War novels by Vietnam vets, lesbian print culture in North Carolina, and the UNC Student Strike of 1970–plus Bulgarian Faulkner, gorilla stories, thwarted lynchings, and a circus cemetery in “Little Dixie.” We’ll also unveil the new Southern Cultures app from UNC Press, which allows readers to access our award-winning content on the go.

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Join us at the Love House for a summer picnic, comments by John Sherer, and fantastic beach music by The Legacy Motown Revue! This event is free and open to the public.

Sacred Spaces Art Reception, Thurs, Feb 5 at 5:30 pm

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please join us at the Center as we unveil our Spring 2015 art exhibit, “Sacred Spaces: A Look Inside the Home of Harlem Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer.”

These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

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Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. In addition to a performance by local musicians from the Durham Symphony Orchestra, the reception will include remarks by Professor Greene, photographer John M. Hall, and Spencer’s granddaughter, Shaun Spencer-Hester, who currently serves as curator for the Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum. North Carolina poet Jeffery Beam will read a small selection from Spencer’s work. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This event, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibit

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please stop by the Center and check out our Spring 2015 art exhibit. These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This exhibit, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public.