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Posts from the ‘Literature’ Category

Student-curated Civil War Exhibit at Wilson Library, Thursday, April 24 at 5:00 pm

drummerboyJoin us at UNC’s Wilson Library for the opening reception of a student-curated exhibit on Civil War poetry, fiction, images, and other archival materials. The exhibit, titled Imagining the U.S. Civil War, 1861-1900, grew out of a course on American literature taught by Professor Eliza Richards.

The students will explain and provide context for the items they selected and researched. Among the items on view will be The Woman in Battle, Loreta Janeta Velazquez’s 1876 memoir about fighting in the Civil War disguised as a man, and an 1862 poem, “Sinking of the Cumberland,” which describes an early instance of modern naval warfare.

Southern Cultures: Spring Issue Reception, Tuesday, February 18 at 5:30 pm

The HelpOur Spring 2014 issue of Southern Cultures takes a critical look at Kathryn Stockett’s bestseller The Help. A literary and film phenomenon, The Help has inspired ongoing debate, some controversy, and many adoring fans. In essays, interviews, photography, and poetry, we explore what makes The Help so provocative and why its themes inspire both serious criticism and real affection.

We welcome Suzanne Jones, Chair of the Department of English at University of Richmond, as our special guest at this event. Professor Jones will read from and discuss her essay on the varied public and scholarly responses to The Help. This will be the third of four special events in the 2013-14 academic year to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of our award-winning quarterly journal.

Suzanne JonesSuzanne Jones has published articles on women novelists and twentieth-century southern fiction in a variety of journals and collections. She is the author of Race Mixing: Southern Fiction since the Sixties (2004) and the editor of five collections of essays and short stories: Poverty and Progress in the U.S. South since 1920 with Mark Newman (2006), South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture with Sharon Monteith (2002), Writing the Woman Artist: Essays on Poetics, Politics, and Portraiture (1991), Crossing the Color Line: Readings in Black and White (2000), and Growing Up in the South (1991, 2003).

Spring 2014 Issue Release

Please join us as we celebrate Southern Cultures‘s 20th anniversary with issue-release parties throughout the 2013-14 academic year. All events are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

The HelpThe Spring 2014 issue takes a critical look at Kathryn Stockett’s bestseller The Help. A literary and film phenomenon, The Help has inspired ongoing debate, some controversy, and won many adoring fans. In essays, interviews, photography, and poetry, we explore what makes The Help so provocative and why its themes inspire both serious criticism and real affection.

We welcome Suzanne Jones, Chair of the Department of English, University of Richmond, as our special guest at the reception for the Spring 2014 Issue. Professor Jones will read from and discuss her essay on the varied public and scholarly response to The Help.

Suzanne JonesSuzanne Jones is professor of English and chair of the department at the University of Richmond. Her articles on twentieth century southern fiction and on women novelists have appeared in a variety of journals and collections. She is the author of Race Mixing: Southern Fiction since the Sixties (2004) and the editor of three collections of essays: Poverty and Progress in the U.S. South since 1920 with Mark Newman (2006), South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture with Sharon Monteith (2002) and Writing the Woman Artist: Essays on Poetics, Politics, and Portraiture (1991); and two collections of stories, Crossing the Color Line: Readings in Black and White (2000) and Growing Up in the South (1991, 2003).

Tell About the South: Jennifer Ho, Thursday, February 6 at 12:30 pm

Asian Americans in DixieThe first book length work of Asian American and southern studies, Asian Americans in Dixie: Race and Migration in the South  (University of Illinois Press, 2013) brings together scholars working in a variety of disciplines, all of whom are invested in analyzing the place of Asian Americans in the U.S. South. Jennifer Ho’s contribution, “Southern Eruptions in Asian American Literature,” focuses specifically on the intersections of Asian American and southern writing. Please join us at the Center for a discussion of Jennifer’s work; lunch will be provided.

Jennifer HoAsian American literature has historically been set on either the East or West coasts, following the trajectory of most Asian American immigration and settlement.  Yet as Asian Americans increasingly populate the South, stories about Asians in America begin to reflect this demographic shift.  From novels like Susan Choi’s The Foreign Student to Mira Nair’s feature-length film Mississippi Masala, the South takes center stage, reorienting Asian American narratives away from West Coast Chinatowns or East Coast suburban subdivisions and reminding audiences of the global and transnational composition of southern communities.  Used as setting, character, and symbol, the South erupts within Asian American literature as a force of violence, shame, and the redemption inherent in change.  In addition to talking about her essay, Ho will discuss the genesis of Asian Americans in Dixie and what it’s like teaching a class devoted to Asian American southern writing (ENGL 371: The Place of Asian Americans in the U.S. South).

Jennifer Ho is an Associate Professor in the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill, where she also serves as the director of graduate studies (English) and teaches courses in Asian American literature, mulitethnic American literature, and Contemporary American literature. Her current book manuscript, Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture (under contract with Rutgers University Press), considers various forms of racially ambiguous subjects (such as transnational/transracial Asian adoptees, multiracial Asian American authors/texts, and Tiger Woods). Additionally, she is broadly interested in critical race theory and anti-racist activism.

What’s Up Down South with Tom Rankin: Tuesday, September 24 at 12:30

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Join us in Donovan Lounge in Greenlaw Hall for “What’s Up Down South,” featuring Tom Rankin, editor of One Place: Paul Kwilecki and Four Decades of Photographs from Decatur County, Georgia (UNC Press, 2013). This event, hosted by William R. Ferris, will take place on Tuesday, September 24, from 12:30pm until 1:30pm.

Come and bring a bag lunch if you’d like! More details here.