Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Literature’ Category

Tell About the South: Sharon Holland, Tuesday, October 21 at 12:30 pm

slj_coverSharon P. Holland (Editor), along with Managing Editor Kathleen Crosby, will speak about their work transitioning SLJ (The Southern Literary Journal) from the Department of English & Comparative Literature to UNC’s Department of American Studies. Taking a very well-known journal from its home in literary studies to a journal with interdisciplinary content is no small feat, and the editors will outline their process as well as sharing their thoughts on Southern Studies, the publishing industry, and contemporary scholarship in American Studies, more broadly.

Holland

Holland is a graduate of Princeton University (1986) and holds a PhD in English and African American Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1992). She is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and (Black) Subjectivity  (Duke UP, 2000), which won the Lora Romero First Book Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA) in 2002. She is also co-author of a collection of trans-Atlantic Afro-Native criticism with Professor Tiya Miles (American Culture, UM, Ann Arbor) entitled Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country (Duke UP, 2006). Professor Holland is also responsible for bringing a feminist classic, The Queen is in the Garbage by Lila Karp to the attention of The Feminist Press (Summer 2007) for publication (2007). She is the author of The Erotic Life of Racism (Duke UP, 2012), a theoretical project that explores the intersection of Critical Race, Feminist, and Queer Theory. She is also at work on the final draft of another book project entitled simply, “little black girl.” You can see her work on food, writing and all things equestrian on her blog, theprofessorstable.wordpress.com. She is currently at work on a new project, “Perishment”: an investigation of the human/animal distinction and the place of discourse on blackness within that discussion. She is presently Professor in and Associate Chair of the Department of American Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Register now for a free online course with William R. Ferris

A new, free, six-week online course that explores the stories, music and art of the American South will be offered Oct. 13 to Nov. 28, developed and taught by the Center’s Senior Associate Director, William R. Ferris, in conjunction with the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education.


About the Course:

This course explores the stories, music, and art of the American South and considers how they serve as a window on the region’s history and culture. We will see how the region’s distinctive sense of place defines music and literature in each generation. From small farms to urban neighborhoods, from the region itself to more distant worlds of the southern diaspora, stories, music, and art chronicle places and the people who live within them.

Our course explores the nature of oral tradition and how its study can provide a methodology for understanding Southern literature. We will discuss Southern artists and photographers and will show how the history and traditions of the South influences their work. We will consider the work of Southern Writers and discuss how they utilize specific stories, music, and art as a structure for literary forms such as the novel and the short story. Lastly, we look into the rich history of southern music and its roots in work chants, fife and drum, and one-strand on the wall musics.

Sign Up:
For more information, and to register for free, visit: www.coursera.org/course/south.

Student-curated Civil War Exhibit at Wilson Library, Thursday, April 24 at 5:00 pm

drummerboyJoin us at UNC’s Wilson Library for the opening reception of a student-curated exhibit on Civil War poetry, fiction, images, and other archival materials. The exhibit, titled Imagining the U.S. Civil War, 1861-1900, grew out of a course on American literature taught by Professor Eliza Richards.

The students will explain and provide context for the items they selected and researched. Among the items on view will be The Woman in Battle, Loreta Janeta Velazquez’s 1876 memoir about fighting in the Civil War disguised as a man, and an 1862 poem, “Sinking of the Cumberland,” which describes an early instance of modern naval warfare.

Southern Cultures: Spring Issue Reception, Tuesday, February 18 at 5:30 pm

The HelpOur Spring 2014 issue of Southern Cultures takes a critical look at Kathryn Stockett’s bestseller The Help. A literary and film phenomenon, The Help has inspired ongoing debate, some controversy, and many adoring fans. In essays, interviews, photography, and poetry, we explore what makes The Help so provocative and why its themes inspire both serious criticism and real affection.

We welcome Suzanne Jones, Chair of the Department of English at University of Richmond, as our special guest at this event. Professor Jones will read from and discuss her essay on the varied public and scholarly responses to The Help. This will be the third of four special events in the 2013-14 academic year to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of our award-winning quarterly journal.

Suzanne JonesSuzanne Jones has published articles on women novelists and twentieth-century southern fiction in a variety of journals and collections. She is the author of Race Mixing: Southern Fiction since the Sixties (2004) and the editor of five collections of essays and short stories: Poverty and Progress in the U.S. South since 1920 with Mark Newman (2006), South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture with Sharon Monteith (2002), Writing the Woman Artist: Essays on Poetics, Politics, and Portraiture (1991), Crossing the Color Line: Readings in Black and White (2000), and Growing Up in the South (1991, 2003).

Spring 2014 Issue Release

Please join us as we celebrate Southern Cultures‘s 20th anniversary with issue-release parties throughout the 2013-14 academic year. All events are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

The HelpThe Spring 2014 issue takes a critical look at Kathryn Stockett’s bestseller The Help. A literary and film phenomenon, The Help has inspired ongoing debate, some controversy, and won many adoring fans. In essays, interviews, photography, and poetry, we explore what makes The Help so provocative and why its themes inspire both serious criticism and real affection.

We welcome Suzanne Jones, Chair of the Department of English, University of Richmond, as our special guest at the reception for the Spring 2014 Issue. Professor Jones will read from and discuss her essay on the varied public and scholarly response to The Help.

Suzanne JonesSuzanne Jones is professor of English and chair of the department at the University of Richmond. Her articles on twentieth century southern fiction and on women novelists have appeared in a variety of journals and collections. She is the author of Race Mixing: Southern Fiction since the Sixties (2004) and the editor of three collections of essays: Poverty and Progress in the U.S. South since 1920 with Mark Newman (2006), South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture with Sharon Monteith (2002) and Writing the Woman Artist: Essays on Poetics, Politics, and Portraiture (1991); and two collections of stories, Crossing the Color Line: Readings in Black and White (2000) and Growing Up in the South (1991, 2003).