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Posts from the ‘Film’ Category

Film Screening & Discussion, Friday, April 11 at 7:00 pm

Editor & DragonPlease join CSAS and the N.C. Pro chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists as we present a free screening of The Editor and the Dragon in the Freedom Forum. Produced and directed by Walt Campbell and Martin Clark, this film relates the story of a small-town newspaper editor and his confrontation with the Ku Klux Klan. Following the film screening, we will host a panel discussion featuring Ken Ripley, veteran publisher, owner, and editor of the Spring Hope Enterprise; Cash Michaels, award-winning editor, chief reporter/ photographer and columnist for The Carolinian; and Phoebe Zerwick, prize-winning investigative journalist with the Winston-Salem Journal and O, The Oprah Magazine. The panel discussion will be moderated by Jock Lauterer, a Senior Lecturer in community journalism at UNC. The Freedom Forum is located on the third floor of Carroll Hall, room 305. For a searchable map of the UNC campus, please click here.

Ed Drag slider

In 1953, Horace Carter earned a Pulitzer Prize for Meritorious Public Service for his reporting on the KKK. Carter persevered in the face of death threats and used the editorial authority of North Carolina’s Tabor City Tribune to protest the Klan’s racist rhetoric and vigilantism. Carter’s bold reporting and the unwavering integrity of his editorials helped lead to the first federal intervention in the South during that era and to the arrest and conviction of nearly 100 klansmen. Narrated by Morgan Freeman, this documentary film relates the story of Carter’s courage and the battle for the soul of a small North Carolina town.

This event is free and open to the public.

Film Screening and Director Q&A: The Muslims Are Coming! Friday, February 7 at 7:00 pm

film promo2The Center is pleased to co-sponsor a film screening and discussion with Negin Farsad, director of the award-winning 2012 documentary The Muslims Are Coming!  Together with Dean Obeidallah and several other Muslim-American comedians, Farsad toured the American “heartland” (including many Southern cities and towns) with two objectives: first, to dispel stereotypes through “Ask a Muslim” booths and Muslim-themed comedy shows, and second, to document the mixed responses that she and her fellow comics received. The documentary reflects Farsad and Obeidallah’s commitment to what they call “social justice comedy.”

Please join us at 7:00 pm on Friday, February 7 at the Nelson Mandela Auditorium in the FedEx Global Education Building.

This event, which is free and open to the public, is planned and organized by the North Carolina Comedy Arts Festival. NCCAF will host its fourteenth annual comedy festival including over 160 acts of stand-up, sketch comedy, and musical improv in Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and Durham from February 6-16, 2014. The film screening and discussion are co-sponsored by UNC’s Department of American Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and Duke’s Center for Muslim Life.

Screening + Q&A

The Center is pleased to co-sponsor a film screening and discussion with Negin Farsad, director of the award-winning 2012 documentary The Muslims Are Coming!  Together with Dean Obeidallah and several other Muslim-American comedians, Farsad toured the American “heartland” (including many Southern cities and towns) with two objectives: first, to dispel stereotypes through “Ask a Muslim” booths and Muslim-themed comedy shows, and second, to document the mixed responses that she and her fellow comics received. The documentary reflects Farsad and Obeidallah’s commitment to what they call “social justice comedy.”

Please join us at 7:00 pm on Friday, February 7 at the Nelson Mandela Auditorium in the FedEx Global Education Building.

This event, which is free and open to the public, is planned and organized by the North Carolina Comedy Arts Festival. NCCAF will host its fourteenth annual comedy festival including over 160 acts of stand-up, sketch comedy, and musical improv in Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and Durham from February 6-16, 2014. The film screening and discussion are co-sponsored by UNC’s Department of American Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and Duke’s Center for Muslim Life.

The Editor and the Dragon to air on Thursday, January 9, 2014

The Center for the Study of the American South and Memory Lane Productions are proud to present The Editor and the Dragon, narrated by Morgan Freeman.

In 1953, UNC graduate Horace Carter earned a Pulitzer Prize for Meritorious Public Service for his reporting on the Ku Klux Klan. Carter persevered in the face of death threats, including those against his family, and used the editorial authority of North Carolina’s Tabor City Tribune to protest the Klan’s racist rhetoric and vigilantism. Carter’s bold reporting and the unwavering integrity of his editorials helped lead to the first federal intervention in the South during that era and to the arrest and conviction of nearly 100 klansmen.

View the trailer, discover educational resources, and find information about local screenings here. And don’t miss the film’s premiere on UNC-TV on January 9 at 10:00 pm. More information about the schedule is available here, and a map describing how to access UNC-TV across North Carolina is posted here!

 

Julian Bond: Civil Rights, Then and Now

Civil rights pioneer and legislator Julian Bond delivered the 2013 Charleston Lecture in Southern Affairs on November 19, 2013, with support from the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. Bond’s address, “Civil Rights, Then and Now,” followed the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, in which he played an important part. It also made clear his unwavering commitment to social justice. As W. Hodding Carter III, Professor of Public Policy and Leadership at UNC, says of Bond, “[He] has been an indomitable long-distance runner in the nation’s ongoing struggle over civil rights.”

View his entire speech below: