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Posts from the ‘Film’ Category

Governors’ Film Screening & Conversation: The Toughest Job, Wed, Sept 9 at 5:30 pm

ToughestJob2Join us in the FedEx Global Education Center for a film screening and conversation with former Mississippi Governor William Winter and former North Carolina Governor Jim Hunt. This Southern Documentary Project film received the 2015 Emmy for Best Historical Documentary from the Southeast division of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Governor Winter was awarded a 2008 Profile in Courage award for his efforts to sponsor, promote, and sign into law Mississippi’s Education Reform Act of 1982. Among other reforms, the act mandated statewide public kindergarten, compulsory school attendance, higher standards for teacher and student performance, and the creation of a lay state board of education.

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This event, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and MFA|EDA at Duke as well as UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives, Global Research Institute, Carolina Center for Public Service, Southern Historical Collection, and Center for the Study of the American South. A trailer for the film can be viewed here.

Film Screening: Deep South, Mon, Feb 16 at 6:00 pm

DEEP SOUTH posterThis event is sponsored by UNC GRITS, a student organization from the Gillings School of Public Health devoted to “Graduate Research and Intervention in The South.”

Delta Blues Celebration, Sat, Jan 31 at 7:30 pm

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Film Screening: Getting Back to Abnormal, Full Frame Theater, Wednesday, November 19 at 7:00 pm

Join us at the Full Frame Theater in Durham’s American Tobacco Campus for a provocative exploration of Southern race and politics on film, followed by a Q&A with Directors Paul Stekler and Andrew Kolker.

abnormalstillNew Orleans’ long history of political dysfunction and complicated racial dynamics gets a new lease on life when Stacy Head, a polarizing white woman, wins a seat on the city council after the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Four years later, she needs black votes to get reelected. But will her record of blunt racial talk doom her chances? GETTING BACK TO ABNORMAL follows the unlikely odd couple of Head and her irrepressible black political advisor, Barbara Lacen-Keller, as they try to navigate New Orleans’ treacherous political scene. With its cast of only-in-New-Orleans characters, Getting Back to Abnormal is a provocative and amusing look at race in America, set against the backdrop of the city’s rich culture. The film had its world premiere at the South by Southwest Film Festival and was nationally broadcast on the PBS series POV in August 2014. You can view a behind-the-scenes discussion between the producers about portraying New Orleans on film here.

This event, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the Southern Oral History Program, the Southern Documentary Fund, and Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies.

Panel Discussion: From George Wallace to New Orleans After Katrina: Southern Race and Politics on Film

wallacejacksonPlease join us in the Freedom Forum on Tuesday, November 18 at 4:30 pm for a panel discussion, using documentary films as the starting point for a larger conversation about how race relations have unfolded in Southern politics. Sharing clips from their own work, our guests will engage the legacies of African Americans who directly challenged Jim Crow, white segregationists who resisted those challenges, and political actors of all races and approaches. The panelists will explore what has and has not changed in this country’s reckoning with civil rights and racial equality.

panelistsThis panel, moderated by Malinda Maynor Lowery (Director, Southern Oral History Program, UNC-Chapel Hill), is co-sponsored by the Southern Oral History Program, the Southern Documentary Fund, and Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies.

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