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What’s Up Down South with Ted Efremoff, Fri, May 1, 2015 at 12:30pm

Senior Associate Director Bill Ferris will introduce us to Ted Efremoff, an Assistant Professor at Greensboro College where he teaches art, administers The Citizen Scholar Lecture Series and directs LIFT Gallery.

Ted will be talking about The Healing Blues Project, an initiative that pairs storytellers experiencing homelessness with blues musicians to create collaborative songs. As cultural producers, storytellers receive an honorarium for their story and share copyright of the song with the musicians. The Healing Blues Project has released an album and works to raise funds for The Interactive Resource Center, a day center for the homeless community of Greensboro.

This event is free and open to the public.  Light refreshments will be served.

SOHP Intern Presentation, Wed, April 29 at 1:00 pm

Interns_croppedThe Southern Oral History Program‘s current interns–Liz Kennedy, Holly Plouff, Bryan Smith, and Samantha Gregg– have been hard at work this semester!  Their project mapped the history of desegregation in North Carolina for high school teachers and created a women’s history walking tour of UNC, all through the medium of oral history. Please join us at the Center to enjoy their creative final project--a performance based on interviews with women about women’s activism at UNC and its relationship to the broader feminist movement.  We know you’ll be impressed with their research and their creative use of performance as a method of disseminating their findings to the community.

Tell About the South: Rob Shapard, Tues, April 21 at 12:30 pm

Rob Shapard copyPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Rob Shapard, a doctoral student in U.S. History and 2014-15 McColl Fellow at CSAS. In his talk, Calculating Eye and Rough Hand: Turning Longleaf into Board Feet and Sawdust,” Shapard will describe the perspective of one sawmilling firm, the Louisiana Central Lumber Company, toward the old-growth Louisiana longleaf pine forests that it felled and milled into lumber in the early twentieth century. The language that the company used to describe longleaf and other trees, a kind of “lumber lexicon,” reveals this perspective and helps to explain the company’s effectiveness in making lumber from longleaf. The topic is one aspect of Shapard’s doctoral dissertation on attitudes toward longleaf pine across the American South. Shapard is a native of the erstwhile textile town of Griffin, Georgia, a former journalist, and a student/scholar of environmental history and oral history.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Music on the Porch: Ellis Dyson and the Shambles, Thurs, April 16 at 5:30 pm

Shambles

Join us on the porch (and lawn) for a lively show by the inimitable Ellis Dyson and the Shambles! This sextet is composed of undergraduate jazz musicians with a deep-seated love and respect for the conventions and practices of the traditional Appalachian musicians that came before them. Front man Ellis Dyson (banjo) knows how to command a crowd with his exuberance and effortless swagger, while supporting instrumentalists Danny Abrams (saxophone), Matt Hall (trumpet), Ledah Finck (fiddle), Nate Huvard (guitar), and Ford Garrard (bass fiddle) provide a tasteful, yet exciting harmonic backing. You can enjoy a recent dorm-room jam by the Shambles here.

Whiskey BusinessWhile still touring in support of their debut EP, Whiskey Business, The Shambles intend to release their debut full-length album soon. As long as there is moonshine in the hills of North Carolina, Ellis Dyson and the Shambles will continue to bring the ruckus. This event is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Dr. Mindi Spencer on “Southern Discomfort,” Wed, April 15 at 4:30 pm

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