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Southern Cultures Double Issue Release Party, Thursday, December 4 at 5:30 pm

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Please join us at the Center as we celebrate the release of two new issues of Southern Cultures! The Winter 2014 issue examines southern politics, dashboard poets, the caning of Charles Sumner, and the “harmless, humorous hick” persona of Gomer Pyle (as well as the actor who came to inhabit that persona). You’ll find photographs by Michael W. Panhorst, poetry by Joseph Bathanti, and important pointers for how to catch and smoke the tastiest eels.

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We’re simultaneously launching our first-ever Best of Food issue, which collects some of our favorite writing on southern food and foodways. Inside you’ll find essays on Native food in the Native South, eating with “molasses-colored glasses,” an early twentieth century “Girls’ Tomato Club,” and more. Order your copy today, or go all out and order the whole tote bag!

April McGreger of Farmer’s Daughter Brand pickles & preserves (featured in the “Best Of” issue) will cater the event. Phil Blank, who painted the cover (left), will provide tunes with his rocking klezmer band, Gmish. And the one and only Bernie Herman, whose writing is featured in both issues, will discuss how he came to eat Hog Island sheep barbacoa. What better way to get in the holiday spirit?

Film Screening: Getting Back to Abnormal, Full Frame Theater, Wednesday, November 19 at 7:00 pm

Join us at the Full Frame Theater in Durham’s American Tobacco Campus for a provocative exploration of Southern race and politics on film, followed by a Q&A with Directors Paul Stekler and Andrew Kolker.

abnormalstillNew Orleans’ long history of political dysfunction and complicated racial dynamics gets a new lease on life when Stacy Head, a polarizing white woman, wins a seat on the city council after the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Four years later, she needs black votes to get reelected. But will her record of blunt racial talk doom her chances? GETTING BACK TO ABNORMAL follows the unlikely odd couple of Head and her irrepressible black political advisor, Barbara Lacen-Keller, as they try to navigate New Orleans’ treacherous political scene. With its cast of only-in-New-Orleans characters, Getting Back to Abnormal is a provocative and amusing look at race in America, set against the backdrop of the city’s rich culture. The film had its world premiere at the South by Southwest Film Festival and was nationally broadcast on the PBS series POV in August 2014. You can view a behind-the-scenes discussion between the producers about portraying New Orleans on film here.

This event, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the Southern Oral History Program, the Southern Documentary Fund, and Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies.

Panel Discussion: From George Wallace to New Orleans After Katrina: Southern Race and Politics on Film

wallacejacksonPlease join us in the Freedom Forum on Tuesday, November 18 at 4:30 pm for a panel discussion, using documentary films as the starting point for a larger conversation about how race relations have unfolded in Southern politics. Sharing clips from their own work, our guests will engage the legacies of African Americans who directly challenged Jim Crow, white segregationists who resisted those challenges, and political actors of all races and approaches. The panelists will explore what has and has not changed in this country’s reckoning with civil rights and racial equality.

panelistsThis panel, moderated by Malinda Maynor Lowery (Director, Southern Oral History Program, UNC-Chapel Hill), is co-sponsored by the Southern Oral History Program, the Southern Documentary Fund, and Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies.

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New Video from SOHP!

Check out this new video about the three missions of the Southern Oral History Program, featuring Jacquelyn Dowd Hall and a variety of graduate and undergraduate SOHP students.

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Hutchins Lecture by CheFarmer Matthew Raiford, Thursday, November 13 at 4:30 pm

In our final Hutchins Lecture of Fall 2014, titled “Sustainable, Organic, & Slow: Restoring the Legacy of Black Family Farms,” Chef & Farmer Matthew Raiford will discuss returning home after a quarter of a century to help restore his family farm. Gilliard Farms has been in Raiford’s family since 1874 and is a Georgia Centennial Family Farm. But what does it mean to be a modern-day farmer in the 21st century and still be sustainable, organic, and slow?

Chef Matthew Raiford in the Organic Garden.  Little St. Simons Island, GA.CheFarmer Raiford is currently the Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Culinary Arts at the College of Coastal Georgia. He holds a Bachelor’s of Professional Studies degree in Culinary Arts from The Culinary Institute of America and a certificate in Ecological Horticulture from UC-Santa Cruz. Raiford is a member of Slow Food USA and a Steering Committee Member for Slow Meat. He previously served as Executive Chef of Haute Catering in Washington, D.C., where he was a preferred caterer for the House of Representatives, the National Defense University, the National Archives, the Pentagon Conference Center and Library, and the Canadian Embassy, where he oversaw a staff of 125 cooking over 2000 meals a day.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039) in Graham Memorial Hall. Light refreshments will be provided.