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Tonight! Music on the Porch: Eric Przedpelski & Friends, Thursday, March 23 at 5:30 pm

 LoveHouseGigPhoto

The premiere Spring show of the Center’s Music on the Porch series will be a tribute to the soul of the late, great David “Fathead” Newman. While some may not recognize his name, most recognize his sound, made famous by numerous Ray Charles hits from the 1950s and 60s. Connecting in their early twenties, Newman and Charles played together for twelve years. Their recordings from those years have been a major influence on the musical journey of saxophonist Eric Przedpelski, who looks forward to sharing some of Fathead’s favorite songs.

Przedpelski will be joined by Mark Templeton (piano) and Nat Reeves (bass), who have played together since their youth. Templeton enjoyed early success, sharing the stage with jazz legends Dizzy Gillespie, Freddie Hubbard, Woody Shaw, and Kenny Garrett. Reeves is one of the most widely respected jazz bassists in history, having toured and recorded with Sonny Stitt, Jackie McLean, Kenny Garrett, Pharaoh Sanders, Pat Metheney, John Scofield, and Curtis Fuller. Joining the group on drums is one the most respected drummers from the Triangle Area, Jake Buchanan.

Please come out and join us for this historic evening! This show is free and open to the public.

Ag-Gag Laws & Body Cams, Thursday, March 23 at 6:00 pm

Ag-Gag Laws

Co-sponsored: Native Leaders Symposium, Fri, March 24

NLS_2017

Tell About the South: Darius Scott & Rachel Cotterman, Tues, March 28 at 12:30 pm

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Back Ways and “Good Roads”

 

Southern Oral History Program field scholars Darius Scott and Rachel Cotterman explore recent findings from Back Ways, an SOHP project that examines the relationship between infrastructure development and experiences of racial segregation in the rural American South. Their talk will focus on the activities of the North Carolina “Good Roads Movement,” Good_Roadsan influential Progressive Era (1890s-1920s) reform project that worked to improve rural roads. The movement was shaped by both appeals to historic agrarian racism and commitments to scientific objectivity. The result was a supposedly unbiased plan that effectively institutionalized inequitable road development. This talk will address the challenges and possibilities of combining archival research and oral history in exploring the rural South as shaped by public policy and lived experience.

This talk is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be provided.

Music on the Porch: Counterclockwise String Band, Thurs, March 30 at 5:30 pm

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Hailing from points as distant as Montgomery, Alabama and Winneconne, Wisconsin, Counterclockwise String Band is (L-R) Tad Smith (dobro), Alan Barnosky (guitar, vocals), Palmyra Romeo (bass), Michael Malek (banjo), and Robert Thornhill (mandolin). Bridging the traditional and the progressive, this Triangle-based quintet offers its own unique interpretations of time-tested melodies. You can enjoy their tunes on YouTube or their website.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!