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Tell About the South: Ted Shaw, Tuesday, September 16 at 12:30 pm

Ted ShawPlease join us at the Love House and Hutchins Forum for a lunchtime discussion with Ted Shaw, Director of UNC’s Center for Civil Rights. Shaw serves as the Julius L. Chambers Distinguished Professor of Law at UNC School of Law, where he teaches Civil Procedure and Advanced Constitutional Law. Before joining the faculty of UNC Law School, Professor Shaw taught at Columbia University Law School from 2008-2014. During that time he was also “Of Counsel” to the law firm of Norton Rose Fulbright (formerly Fulbright & Jaworski, LLP).  His practice involved civil litigation and representation of institutional clients on matters concerning diversity and civil rights.

The title of Professor Shaw’s talk will be “The Work and Mission of the Center for Civil Rights.” Since its founding by Julius L. Chambers (1936-2013) in 2001, the Center has strived to extend America’s promise of justice, prosperity, and opportunity by elevating families and communities above the boundaries of race, class, and place. Its mission is to use community-based impact advocacy and legal education and scholarship to advance strategies that secure social, economic, and environmental justice for low wealth, minority families, and neighborhoods.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Hutchins Lecture by David Hurst Thomas, Thursday, September 18 at 4:30 pm

ThomasOur first Hutchins lecture of the 2014-15 academic year, titled “Romance and Reality in the Deep South’s Mythical Mission Past,” will address the nostalgia and romance that has long surrounded the Franciscan and Jesuit missions across America. From San Francisco through the Southwest to the American South, mainstream American history has constructed and perpetuated an idealized, romanticized version of the Spanish mission – complete with Mission Revival architectural styles and reconstructed archaeological sites that sometimes resemble Hollywood stage sets. This illustrated talk draws upon recent archaeological evidence from St. Catherines Island (Georgia) and suggests more historically appropriate perspectives on the mission heritage of the Deep South. The discovery of Mission Santa Catalina de Guale has contributed significantly to knowledge about early inhabitants of the island and about the Spanish presence in Georgia, nearly two centuries before the arrival of British colonists. This lecture will be held in the Pleasants Room at UNC’s Wilson Library.

St CatherinesDavid Hurst Thomas has served since 1972 as Curator of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History.  He has organized and directed more than 100 archaeological excavations, including the discovery of Gatecliff Shelter in Nevada, the deepest archaeological rockshelter in the Americas. He has also taught at Columbia University, New York University, University of California (Davis), University of Florida, University of Nevada, and the City College of New York. Thomas is the author of over 30 books, including St. Catherines: An Island in Time (University of Georgia Press, 2010) and Skull Wars (Basic Books, 2001).

Music on the Porch: Open the Door for Three with Jerron Paxton, Monday, September 22 at 5:30 pm

Open the Door for Three

Please join us on the porch for an exciting performance by Open the Door for Three! The trio, self-described as a “road-tested, audience-approved, high-octane, fist-in-glove, laughing-out-loud trio of Irish musicians,” consists of Liz Knowles, Pat Broaders, and Kieran O’Hare. The trio takes its name from an old Irish slip jig which they regularly perform. Liz has also assembled an impressive CV as a solo performer, appearing with the New York Pops, Cherish the Ladies, and the Celtic Legends.

JerronPaxtonbanjoTraditional blues and bluegrass performer Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton will open with songs and stories about the black roots of the banjo. This performance, which is free and open to the public, was made possible through the NEA-funded Black and Global Roots project, with support from Carolina Seminars and the Friday Center. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Tell About the South: Kathleen DuVal, Tuesday, September 23 at 12:30 pm

Kathleen DuValPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Kathleen DuVal, Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. DuVal’s talk, titled “Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution,”  focuses on the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. Based on her research for a forthcoming book by the same title, “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences, including incorporation into a rising American republic.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Music on the Porch: Joe Troop & Diego Sánchez, Thursday, October 9 at 5:30 pm

Troop & Sanchez tourWhen self-described “North Carolina-born banjoist, fiddler, singer-songwriter and nomad” Joe Troop graduated from UNC and moved to Buenos Aires, says his bandmate Diego Sánchez, “he ruined everything.” Before that, Sánchez had claimed to be “the only banjo player in Argentina.”

Now the acoustic world-music duo is returning stateside for their first U.S. tour, funded in part by a Kickstarter campaign. Join us on the porch at the Love House for a blend of traditional North Carolina and Latin American music, inspired at Carolina and perfected 5,000 miles away. This event is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!!