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Hutchins Lecture: E. Patrick Johnson, Thurs, Jan 26 at 4:30 pm

In this lecture, titled “The Beekeeper: Collecting Oral Histories of Black Southern Queer Women,” Johnson will discuss some methodological challenges of being a man conducting research on women as well as addressing some topics that he found to be common among many of the women he interviewed. He will also perform excerpts from the oral histories.

epjE. Patrick Johnson is Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity, and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History. He is the editor of Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood (Michigan UP, 2013) and co-editor (with Mae G. Henderson) of Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology and (with Ramon Rivera-Servera) of solo/black/woman: scripts, interviews, and essays and Blacktino Queer Performance (Duke UP, 2016).

This lecture, co-sponsored by the Department of Communication, will be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: Julie Reed, Thurs, Feb 16 at 4:30 pm

“What is the real basis of a public enterprise?”: The Cherokee Nation and the Social Safety Net

reedIn this lecture, Reed will discuss why nineteenth-century Cherokee people chose to surrender aspects of their holistic system of care for others rooted within a matrilineal clan system and governed by local community obligations and clan responsibilities that stretched across towns in favor of nationally administered social services by the Cherokee Nation to individual citizens. This shift ultimately resulted in the creation of an orphanage, a prison, and a facility for the (dis)abled and mentally ill in the period after the Civil War.  Reed will share how Cherokee people evaluated the quality of their institutions and the conditions that led them to study and critique the social policies of states and the larger United States.reed-serving-the-nation

Julie Reed is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Her book Serving the Nation: Cherokee Sovereignty and Social Welfare, 1800-1907 was published by the University of Oklahoma Press in 2016. This lecture will be held in the Pleasants Family Room at Wilson Library. The lecture is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Chandler Lecture: Trevon D. Logan & Caitlin Rosenthal, Mon, March 6 at 4:30 pm

logan-rosenthal

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, economic historians have produced a number of new studies that “reshape how [we] view the connection between slavery and capitalism… show[ing] the role that coercion played in bringing about a modern market system that is more typically identified with freedom.” Was the economic rise of the West dependent upon slavery, or has the economic impact of cotton production been overstated? Have historians of cotton’s “empire” been playing fast and loose with the facts? Or have the economists become “champion nitpickers,” to quote Eric Foner, reducing history to “a source of numbers, a source of data to throw into their equations”?

This year’s Chandler Lecture in Southern Business History will be delivered by Trevon D. Logan and Caitlin Rosenthal. Logan, the Chair of Economics at Ohio State University, is the author of many articles in leading economics, economic history, and sociology journals, and a forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press. Rosenthal, Assistant Professor of History at the University of California Berkeley, is the author of From Slavery to Scientific Management (forthcoming from Harvard University Press).

This lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the Davis Research Hub, on the second floor of Davis Library. Light refreshments will be served.

Music on the Porch: Counterclockwise String Band, Thurs, March 30 at 5:30 pm

counterclockwise

Hailing from points as distant as Montgomery, Alabama and Winneconne, Wisconsin, Counterclockwise String Band is (L-R) Tad Smith (dobro), Alan Barnosky (guitar, vocals), Palmyra Romeo (bass), Michael Malek (banjo), and Robert Thornhill (mandolin). Bridging the traditional and the progressive, this Triangle-based quintet offers its own unique interpretations of time-tested melodies. You can enjoy their tunes on YouTube or their website.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Best of Fall 2016 Music on the Porch

We hope you enjoyed the latest installments of the Center’s outdoor music series. In case you missed them, or if you’d like to relive the experience, click below to hear a few of our favorite numbers. We’ll be back on the porch (and lawn) with more great acts in Spring 2017!