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Tell About the South: Kyle T. Mays, Tues, Feb 9 at 12:30

Rebel-Music

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion titled “From Red Power to Hip Hop: The Urban Indigenous Experience in Postwar America.” Indigenous people and urban spaces are often rendered incompatible in both historical and contemporary scholarship. Along this line of thinking, Native people are “pre-modern” while cities are “modern,” thus Native people exist outside of modernity. And yet, they have always been in cities and engaged with urban culture. They were influenced by and helped shape urban culture for the last several decades in significant ways. Spanning the late 20th and early 21st centuries, this talk explores the links between the Red Power movement and the most significant cultural movement since that time: the emergence of Hip Hop in Indigenous North America. Two questions frame my talk. What role did urban culture play in the shaping of the Red Power movement? What is the link between the Red Power movement and Indigenous Hip Hop today? Using Critical Indigenous Studies frameworks, this talk argues that Native people, long fighting the colonial baggage of invisibility, have used urban spaces and cultures to help assert their humanity as modern Indigenous people in postwar America.

kylemaysKyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Chippewa) is a transdisciplinary scholar of modern U.S. history, urban history, indigenous studies, and comparative ethnic studies. As a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at UNC-Chapel Hill, he is currently working on two projects. The first is a revised version of his dissertation, titled Indigenous Detroit: Indigeneity, Race, and Gender in the Construction of the Modern Motor City, which analyzes the role of indigeneity in the construction of 20th century Detroit. The second is a book-length manuscript titled Hip Hop Beats, Indigenous Rhymes: Modernity and Hip Hop in Indigenous North America, which is currently under contract with SUNY Press.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Hutchins Lecture by Gregory D. Smithers, Thurs, Feb 11 at 4:30 pm

The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement, and Identity – 039 Graham Memorial Hall

Cherokee DiasporaThe Cherokee are one of the largest Native American tribes in the United States, with more than three hundred thousand people across the country claiming tribal membership and nearly one million people internationally professing to have at least one Cherokee Indian ancestor. In this revealing history of Cherokee migration and resettlement, Professor Gregory Smithers uncovers the origins of the Cherokee diaspora and explores how communities and individuals have negotiated their Cherokee identities, even when geographically removed from the Cherokee Nation headquartered in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Beginning in the eighteenth century, the author transports the reader back in time to tell the poignant story of the Cherokee people migrating throughout North America, including their forced exile along the infamous Trail of Tears (1838–39). Smithers tells a remarkable story of courage, cultural innovation, and resilience, exploring the importance of migration and removal, land and tradition, culture and language in defining what it has meant to be Cherokee for a widely scattered people.

IMG_2380Gregory D. Smithers is an Associate Professor of Native American History at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of The Cherokee Diaspora (Yale University Press, 2015) and Slave Breeding: Sex, Violence, and Memory in African American History  (University Press of Florida, 2013), and the co-editor (with Brooke N. Newman) of Native Diasporas (University of Nebraska Press, 2014).

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Taylor Livingston, Wed, Feb 17 at 12:30

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion titled “Social Medicine: Prenatal Care in a Group Setting.”

This is not your standard biomedical prenatal visit: there are nametags, cookies, and group yoga. CenteringPregnancy (CP) is a facilitative, non-hierarchal group prenatal healthcare program, which challenges the traditional provider-patient model of prenatal care and its central tenet that women and their pregnant bodies need medical professionals’ surveillance and intervention. Research has shown that participants of CP have better perinatal outcomes than women seeking traditional prenatal care. However, why CP participants have better perinatal outcomes is unknown. Based on an ethnographic investigation of CP sites in Durham, NC, this talk explores how the macro-level forces of cultural and historical intersections of race, gender, and socioeconomics in the South influence the subjective experience of CP programs.

Cp babies

Taylor Livingston is a PhD candidateLivingston in UNC’s Department of Anthropology and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Her dissertation examines the intersections of race, class, and gender in the South through the lens of motherhood. Specifically, she researches how history, race, and class shape the birth outcomes of women participating in CenteringPregnacy. Taylor also coordinates the undergraduate intern program for the Southern Oral History Program.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

New Roots / Nuevas Raíces program & reception

Invitation_final

Please join us in the FedEx Center for Global Education to celebrate the launch of the New Roots/ Nuevas Raíces: Voices from Carolina del Norte oral history website and digital information system. This bilingual initiative documents demographic transformations in North Carolina by collecting extraordinary stories of Latino migration, settlement, and integration.

This interactive event will feature listening stations where guests can sample these interviews for themselves and an opportunity to talk to the New Roots team, which includes archivists, anthropologists, software developers, UNC students, and North Carolina residents who have donated their stories. Music will be provided by members of Charanga Carolina. Come learn about the South’s New Roots / Nuevas Raíces!

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Co-sponsored event: Swimming in Dark Waters, Sun, Feb 28 at 7:30 pm

Swimming

Hosted by Carolina Performing Arts, “Swimming in Dark Waters: Other Voices of the American Experience” features Rhiannon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops together with folk singer/songwriter Bhi Bhiman and cellist/singer Leyla McCalla. The trio delves into the profound yet too often overlooked history of protest, subversion, and cultural resistance by musicians of color in the United States, from its original inhabitants to recently arrived immigrants. Receive a 10% discount off your ticket prices by entering the code UNCSOUTH10.