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Panel on the Death Penalty in North Carolina, Thurs, Mar 2 at 4:30 pm

Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum for a discussion of the current state and politics of the death penalty. This program is offered in conjunction with the new Process Series production Count. Directed by Lynden Harris, Count will be performed on Friday, March 3 and Saturday, March 4 at 8:00 pm. More details about the play are available here.

Our panel will feature Professors Frank Baumgartner and Isaac Unah (UNC Political Science); Jennifer Thompson (author of Picking Cotton and President of Healing Justice); and Lynden Harris (Hidden Voices). This event is free and open to the public.

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Co-sponsored event: Jewish Food in the Global South Symposium, March 4-5

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This symposium, sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, will explore the historical trends and current cultural practices surrounding Jewish food in and of the American South. Appealing to both public and academic audiences, this symposium will feature dynamic presentations by Jewish foodways and cultural scholars, culinary critics, and James Beard award-winning chefs. Panel discussions will investigate what makes a food “Jewish” in the diverse social and cultural contexts of the United States, and how that designation affects the lives of its creators and consumers. Through examination of specific ingredients such as pastrami, iconic foods such as the knish and hummus, and particular cooking traditions that negotiate the laws of kashrut, participants will discuss how the distinct social, economic, and political dimensions of different regional cultures determine how Jewish foods are prepared, eaten, and interpreted, particularly in the context of the Jewish South.

Pre-registration is required for this symposium. Tickets cost $10 but are free for UNC students. Registration includes lunch, evening reception and morning and afternoon breaks. You can view the entire program here and purchase tickets here.

Co-sponsored event: Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz, Sunday, Mar 5 at 3:00 pm

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Chandler Lecture: Trevon D. Logan & Caitlin Rosenthal, Mon, March 6 at 4:30 pm

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According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, economic historians have produced a number of new studies that “reshape how [we] view the connection between slavery and capitalism… show[ing] the role that coercion played in bringing about a modern market system that is more typically identified with freedom.” Was the economic rise of the West dependent upon slavery, or has the economic impact of cotton production been overstated? Have historians of cotton’s “empire” been playing fast and loose with the facts? Or have the economists become “champion nitpickers,” to quote Eric Foner, reducing history to “a source of numbers, a source of data to throw into their equations”?

This year’s Chandler Lecture in Southern Business History will be delivered by Trevon D. Logan and Caitlin Rosenthal. Logan, the Chair of Economics at Ohio State University, has published influential articles in economics, economic history, and sociology journals, as well as a forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press. Rosenthal, Assistant Professor of History at the University of California Berkeley, is the author of From Slavery to Scientific Management (forthcoming from Harvard University Press).

This lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the Davis Research Hub, on the second floor of Davis Library. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: Robert Gipe, Thurs, March 9 at 4:30 pm

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“Storytellers and Sociopaths: Thoughts on How We Define Reality from Post-Obama Appalachia”

This lecture will explore connections between the rich storytelling tradition, grinding economic challenges, hard political choices, despair, and hope experienced by people in the southeast Kentucky coalfields. Gipe will read from his previously published fiction, and he will address the creation of the Higher Ground community performances, a series of oral history-based theater events in Harlan County, Kentucky which have been running from 2003 to the present.

Gipe_TrampolineRobert Gipe is the author of the award-winning illustrated novel Trampoline (Ohio University Press, 2015). His short story “Dreadful Crash” appeared in the 21C Fiction Issue of Southern Cultures (Fall 2016). Gipe teaches at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, where he directs the Appalachian Studies program. He has worked previously as a pickle packer, a forklift driver, and a DJ.

This lecture, to be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.