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Music on the Porch: Open the Door for Three with Jerron Paxton, Monday, September 22 at 5:30 pm

Open the Door for Three

Please join us on the porch for an exciting performance by Open the Door for Three! The trio, self-described as a “road-tested, audience-approved, high-octane, fist-in-glove, laughing-out-loud trio of Irish musicians,” consists of Liz Knowles, Pat Broaders, and Kieran O’Hare. The trio takes its name from an old Irish slip jig which they regularly perform. Liz has also assembled an impressive CV as a solo performer, appearing with the New York Pops, Cherish the Ladies, and the Celtic Legends.

JerronPaxtonbanjoTraditional blues and bluegrass performer Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton will open with songs and stories about the black roots of the banjo. This performance, which is free and open to the public, was made possible through the NEA-funded Black and Global Roots project, with support from Carolina Seminars and the Friday Center. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Tell About the South: Kathleen DuVal, Tuesday, September 23 at 12:30 pm

Kathleen DuValPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Kathleen DuVal, Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. DuVal’s talk, titled “Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution,”  focuses on the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. Based on her research for a forthcoming book by the same title, “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences, including incorporation into a rising American republic.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Music on the Porch: UNC Student Jazz Combo, Thursday, September 25 at 5:30 pm

Come join us on the porch and hear UNC’s homegrown jazz virtuosos, coached by Jim Ketch, Ed Paolantonio, and Stephen Anderson. With members hailing all the way from North Carolina to Copenhagen, The Renaissance Collective is a diverse group of musicians whose contemporary sound is both cutting-edge and firmly rooted in the jazz tradition.

The group includes Nate Huvard (Guitar), Atticus Reynolds (Drums), Adam Maloney (Bass), David Klingman (Piano), Jorgen Stenbaek (Trumpet), Eric Przedpelski (Alto Sax), Cameron Cook (Tenor Sax), and Hope Thomson (Vocals). The students will perform a mix of contemporary jazz, original compositions, and their own interpretations of selections from the Great American Songbook.

Jazz_Combo

This performance will showcase the flourishing jazz program at UNC-Chapel Hill. In recent years, the university’s jazz band and jazz combos have hosted and performed with the Marcus Roberts Trio, Wycliffe Gordon, Jamey Aebersold, Phil Degreg, Greg Gisbert, the Lynn Seaton Trio, Harry Waters, and many others. We can’t wait to see what good things they have in store for us. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Music on the Porch: Lonnie Holley, Wednesday, October 1 at 5:30 pm

Lonnie 1Please join us on the porch to appreciate a multimodal artist who defies all genres and categories. During his week-long visit to UNC-Chapel Hill in late September and early October, Lonnie Holley will visit classes in Art, Folklore, and American Studies, create new sculptures with found and recycled materials, engage in public conversations, and perform at the Center.

Over the last forty years, Holley has created an amazing series of sculptures, assemblages, and multimedia performances. Working primarily with “scrap,” recycled, and found materials, he creates art from the detritus of modern American society. Holley’s aesthetic is invested in rehabilitated beauty: finding art in the ugly places. Although he has recently been featured in the New York Times and the Washington Post, Lonnie’s work has largely lived outside the curated spaces of art museums and critical reviews. He represents what American Studies professor Bernie Herman calls the “Birmingham-Bessemer School”: a cohort of Alabama artists whose work speaks to the deep conflicted histories of the American South and beyond.


Lonnie2

You can hear a sample of Lonnie’s music and see more of his work here.

Music on the Porch: Joe Troop & Diego Sánchez, Thursday, October 9 at 5:30 pm

Troop & Sanchez tourWhen self-described “North Carolina-born banjoist, fiddler, singer-songwriter and nomad” Joe Troop graduated from UNC and moved to Buenos Aires, says his bandmate Diego Sánchez, “he ruined everything.” Before that, Sánchez had claimed to be “the only banjo player in Argentina.”

Now the acoustic world-music duo is returning stateside for their first U.S. tour, funded in part by a Kickstarter campaign. Join us on the porch at the Love House for a blend of traditional North Carolina and Latin American music, inspired at Carolina and perfected 5,000 miles away. This event is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!!