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CSAS Welcomes 2015-16 Work-Study Students!

WorkStudy1516Please help us welcome our latest additions to the CSAS team. From left to right, they are Tanner Glenn, a sophomore majoring in Political Science; Katie Yelton, a senior majoring in American Studies with a minor in Women’s Studies; Cassidy Hampton,Jernigan a first-year planning to major in Mathematical Decision Sciences; and Karen Ortiz, a junior majoring in Psychology and Neuroscience. Molly Jernigan (right) is a senior majoring in Global Studies, with minors in French and History. We are happy to have these fantastic folks at the Love House and Hutchins Forum!

Music on the Porch: Lakota John & Kin, Thurs, Sept 3 at 5:30

Join us at the Center for an evening of locally grown Native blues! A proud Lumbee and Oglala Nation family of talented musicians, Lakota John & Kin are based out of Robeson County, NC. At 18 years old, Lakota John is a master guitarist with a voice that sounds beyond his years. He grew up listening to his dad’s music collection, picked up the harmonica at age seven, and added the guitar at age nine. A year later, he bought himself a glass slide and picked up the slide guitar. At 16, he released Lakota John and Kin, his debut record on the Music Maker label. You can sample tracks on ReverbNation and YouTube.

Lakota John and Kin pic

Since the creation of blues music, Native folks have made often-overlooked but meaningful contributions to this southern musical tradition. Charlie Patton, Scrapper Blackwell, Jesse Ed Davis, Elizabeth Cotton, and Jimi Hendrix are among the many great blues and jazz artists that celebrated their Native American heritage. Lakota John & Kin continue this history, fusing traditional tunes with their own rich cultural heritage.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for awhile!

Governors’ Film Screening & Conversation: The Toughest Job, Wed, Sept 9 at 5:30 pm

ToughestJob2Join us in the FedEx Global Education Center for a film screening and conversation with former Mississippi Governor William Winter and former North Carolina Governor Jim Hunt. This Southern Documentary Project film received the 2015 Emmy for Best Historical Documentary from the Southeast division of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Governor Winter was awarded a 2008 Profile in Courage award for his efforts to sponsor, promote, and sign into law Mississippi’s Education Reform Act of 1982. Among other reforms, the act mandated statewide public kindergarten, compulsory school attendance, higher standards for teacher and student performance, and the creation of a lay state board of education.

SouthernDocs

This event, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and MFA|EDA at Duke as well as UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives, Global Research Institute, Carolina Center for Public Service, Southern Historical Collection, Center for the Study of the American South, and Hunt Institute. A trailer for the film can be viewed here.

Rostros del Tiempo Art Reception, Thurs, Sept 10 at 5:30 pm

BorderOdysseyThis fall the Center is honored to showcase a photography collection titled Rostros del Tiempo: Faces of Time. Taken by Charles D. Thompson, Jr., these portraits depict the faces of former Braceros (or sometimes their widows, who stand for them) who once worked in U.S. fields, harvesting crops and providing food for American consumers from 1942-1964. These elderly men and women gather every Sunday in Ciudad Juarez to protest because they still have not received the retirement benefits they earned half a century ago. We are honored to host former Bracero Don Modesto Zurita Estrada as well as professor and community organizer Luis Alfonso Herrera Robles. You can read about the Braceros in Thompson’s new book, Border Odyssey (University of Texas Press, 2015), or view a short film about the Border Odyssey project here.

BorderMapRostros2

These photographs represent thousands more ex-Braceros near Ciudad Juarez and elsewhere in Mexico and the U.S., including those not pictured and those already passed on–as well as workers everywhere whose pay has been shortchanged. The event will also feature Luis Del Río and Juanito Laguna performing traditional Latin American rhythms and folk/rock tunes from their forthcoming album, “Inmigrante.” This event is free and open to the public; light refreshments will be served.

 

Hutchins Lecture: Sam W. Haynes, Wed, Sept 16 at 4:30 pm

Join us in the Pleasants Room at Wilson Library for the first James and Marguerite Hutchins Lecture of 2015-16, as Dr. Sam W. Haynes presents a lecture on “Unbecoming Southern: The Roots of Texas Exceptionalism.”

haynesMany Texas historians have argued that the bitter experience of the Civil War prompted white Texans in later years to downplay their southern roots. In an effort to disassociate the state from the trauma of the Lost Cause, they tailored their historical memory to give greater emphasis to the region’s frontier heritage. In so doing, they laid claim to an artificial brand of exceptionalism, constructing an elaborate and ennobling mythology around the exploits of Anglo-Texans in their conflicts with Mexicans and Native Americans. However, Anglo-Texan men and women sought to craft a new identity for the state in strikingly different ways. This lecture will examine efforts to rebrand Texas in the early twentieth century, emphasizing the gendered dimensions of a process in which women’s organizations, such as the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, and male business leaders offered their own distinct interpretations of the state’s past.

Sam W. Haynes is a professor of History and director of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies at UT-Arlington. Specializing in Jacksonian America, 19th century Texas, and the American Southwest, he is the author of three books, including Unfinished Revolution: Unfinished RevolutionThe Early American Republic in a British World, a study of nineteenth century American attitudes toward Great Britain, and James K. Polk and the Expansionist Impulse. He is the editor of an anthology of essays, Contested Empire: Rethinking the Texas Revolution, which was published last month by Texas A&M University Press. His current book project examines Anglo, Mexican, and Native American conflict in Texas during the early nineteenth century.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.