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Now Hiring Work-Study Students!

The Center seeks motivated work-study students for the 2014-15 academic year. Southern bonafides are not required, but an active interest in Southern history and culture is desirable! We design our work-study positions to be mutually beneficial, flexible, and resume-building. Interested applicants can contact Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu or 919-962-0553.

Music on the Porch: Shirlette Ammons & jocElyn Ellis, Thursday, August 28 at 5:30 pm

Come help us kick off our 2014-15 Music on the Porch series with North Carolina hip-hop/funk rebels Shirlette Ammons and jocElyn Ellis. In addition to their groundbreaking solo work, both musicians are part of the Next Level hip-hop diplomacy program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and directed by UNC Music professor Mark Katz. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!  

Shirlette AmmonsShirlette Ammons is a Mt. Olive native and Durham-based poet and musician who also directs a youth arts program. Her recent projects include And Lovers Like, a collaborative album with the Dynamite Brothers, and Matching Skin, a poetry collection from Carolina Wren Press. Ammons’s debut solo album, Twilight for Gladys Bentley, updated and reinterpreted the unsung blues singer who defied sexual and gender norms while putting on some of the hippest performances during Harlem’s Jazz Age.

Jocelyn EllisCharlotte-area singer/ songwriter jocElyn Ellis’s soulful voice and writing talent also combine for a powerful mix. jocElyn released her crowdfunded debut album, Life of a Hologram, in November 2013. She has performed around the world with Wyclef Jean, Everclear, and her previous band, The Alpha Theory. She recently launched a new songwriting project, The Apple Seed Society. Come see this amazing duo next Thursday!

Fish and an Ish! Friday Fish Fry & Photo Exhibit, September 12 at 5:30 pm

Join us at the Love House and Hutchins Forum for the opening reception of our fall art exhibit, “An Eye For Mullet,” co-sponsored by UNC Press. These photographs, taken in a North Carolina mullet camp by Charles A. Farrell in 1938, were collected and curated by historian David S. Cecelski for an annotated photo essay that appears in the forthcoming issue of Southern Cultures. “Our world today is so different than that of only a century ago,” writes Cecelski, “that few people can recognize even the most basic aspects of daily life and labor as seen in [these] photographs.” Yet the black-and-white images reveal “the changing nature of our relationship to the ocean and seashore.”

Saltbox logoTo celebrate the issue’s release, we have invited Ricky Moore of Durham’s Saltbox Seafood Joint to serve up some of his signature sustainable seafood from the Carolina coast. We’ll also enjoy live music on the porch by Wayne Martin & Friends. The reception is free and open to the public, and $20 gets you “Fish and an Ish”: a plate of Ricky’s delicious seafood plus the Fall 2014 issue of Southern Cultures. To purchase tickets, click here.

Hutchins Lecture by David Hurst Thomas, Thursday, September 18 at 4:30 pm

ThomasOur first Hutchins lecture of the 2014-15 academic year, titled “Romance and Reality in the Deep South’s Mythical Mission Past,” will address the nostalgia and romance that has long surrounded the Franciscan and Jesuit missions across America. From San Francisco through the Southwest to the American South, mainstream American history has constructed and perpetuated an idealized, romanticized version of the Spanish mission – complete with Mission Revival architectural styles and reconstructed archaeological sites that sometimes resemble Hollywood stage sets. This illustrated talk draws upon recent archaeological evidence from St. Catherines Island (Georgia) and suggests more historically appropriate perspectives on the mission heritage of the Deep South. The discovery of Mission Santa Catalina has contributed significantly to knowledge about early inhabitants of the island and about the Spanish presence in Georgia nearly two centuries before the arrival of British colonists.

St CatherinesDavid Hurst Thomas has served since 1972 as Curator of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History.  He has organized and directed more than 100 archaeological excavations, including the discovery of Gatecliff Shelter in Nevada, the deepest archaeological rockshelter in the Americas. He has also taught at Columbia University, New York University, University of California (Davis), University of Florida, University of Nevada, and the City College of New York. Thomas is the author of over 30 books, including St. Catherines: An Island in Time (University of Georgia Press, 2010) and Skull Wars (Basic Books, 2001).

Deltra Tate named Administrative Manager of CSAS

Deltra2The Center for the Study of the American South proudly announces Deltra Tate as our new Administrative Manager and Events Coordinator. Her appointment began on July 7, 2014. Tate comes to the Center from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, where she served as a staff specialist in the Admissions Department.

“Deltra Tate brings expertise in human resources management and event planning to the Center,” said Kenneth Janken, Interim Director of the Center.  “A native and life-long resident of Durham and a product of North Carolina’s public schools, Deltra has earned both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business administration.  With her varied experiences in higher education and private industry, Deltra is certain to ensure the smooth running of the Center and its programming.”