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Posts from the ‘Critical Conversations’ Category

Education & Resegregation Town Hall, Thurs, April 19 at 7:00 pm

Can’t attend in person? Follow along with our Livestream: https://livestream.com/accounts/10268920/AmericanSouth and Tweet us your questions @UNCSouth with the hashtag #SeparateIsUnequal.

How much racial progress has been made in America since 1955, when the U.S. Supreme Court ordered all 50 states to desegregate public schools “with all deliberate speed”? Or, as Clarence Page has asked, how much progress has been made on school desegregation since Martin Luther King, Jr was assassinated in 1968? We have invited four experts on school desegregation to share their knowledge and answer questions about disturbing trends toward school resegregation in the South. For more information about the panelists and moderator, please click here.

2018 Chandler Conversation, Tues, March 27 at 7:00 pm

For more info about our panelists, moderator, and co-sponsors, please click here!

Hutchins Conversation: Jason Oliver Chang, Tues, Mar 20 at 4:30 pm

Anti-Chinese Racism and the Making of the Mexican Mestizo

Jason Oliver Chang is Assistant Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. At UConn he is an affiliated faculty member with the Maritime Studies Institute as well as the Institute of Latinx, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies and the Associate Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. In 2010 Jason earned his PhD in Comparative Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico, 1880-1940 (University of Illinois Press, 2017) and co-author of Asian America: A Primary Source Reader (Yale University Press, 2017). He has published articles in the Journal for Asian American Studies, the Pacific Historical Review, and the Journal of Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures in the Americas. Jason’s current work rewrites Asian American history from the perspective of Chinese, South Asian, and Filipino sailors to think how racial formations work at sea.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the University Room at Hyde Hall. Special thanks to our co-sponsors: the Department of American Studies, the Institute for the Study of the Americas, the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Asia Center, the Chinese Undergraduate Student Association, the Carolina Hispanic Association, the Latina/o Studies Program, the Center for Global Initiatives, and the Institute for Arts and Humanities.

Hutchins Conversation: Lisa McKeithan, Tues, March 6 at 4:30 pm

Health and the Humanities in Practice: Using a Liberal Arts Approach to Rural Health Challenges in North Carolina

Lisa McKeithan (far right) and the CommWell Health team accept an award for their work

Lisa McKeithan, MS, CRC, is Director and HIV/AIDS Researcher at CommWell Health Clinics in Dunn, North Carolina, an award-winning not-for-profit Federally Qualified Health Center. McKeithan is Director of CommWell Health’s NC-REACH program, which serves patients who are both HIV-positive and homeless. The National Rural Health Association named it Outstanding Program of the Year, and McKeithan the Outstanding Educator of the Year. In conversation with Dr. Martha King, Teaching Assistant Professor of Medical Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill, McKeithan will discuss the ways in which the humanities and social sciences shape her approach to healthcare in the rural South.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall.

Co-sponsored event: Frederick Douglass’s Legacies

Art by Blake Chamberlain

As we celebrate the 200th anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s birth, we consider the following questions: What would Frederick Douglass think of 2018? What did his contemporaries think of him? What was Douglass’s impact, then and now? What is (y)our understanding of this great historical figure?

Join us at the Chapel Hill Public Library in Meeting Room B on Thursday, Feb 22 at 7:00 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Special thanks to our co-sponsors: Carolina Public Humanities, Town of Chapel Hill, Town of Carrboro, and Orange County NAACP chapter.