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Harvest Moon Celebration 2018

CSAS is proud to be a cosponsor for UNC Edible Campus’s Harvest Moon Celebration 2018: Corn Across Cultures.

Enjoy an evening under the light of the Harvest Moon, as we celebrate the fall season of harvest in the Edible Campus UNC* Garden, and the vibrant food cultures of the region. We will hear the stories of inspiring local food and social justice leaders, and celebrate the next generation of food activists.

THIS YEAR’S LINEUP:

– Vimala Rajendran, Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe
– Spring Council, “Collards and Caviar,” Mama Dip’s Kitchen
– Cecilia Polanco, So Good Pupusas
– Ryan Dial-Stanley, Lumbee student, storyteller, and musician
– Dissimilar South, UNC/Chapel Hill’s southern folk band
– Spoken word artists of the UNC Chapel Hill community, and more!

Attendees are encouraged to pack dinner and blanket, and enjoy this evening Forest Theatre. Light snacks and refreshments featuring ingredients from the Edible Campus Garden will be available from UNC’s student food justice organizations. This event is free and open to the public.

Event organized in partnership with Center for Study of the American South, Carolina Performing Arts, American Indian Center, Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and UNC’s student food justice organizations.

PLEASE RSVP HERE.

* Edible Campus UNC is a program of the North Carolina Botanical Garden that creates edible landscapes across the UNC Chapel Hill campus to facilitate student engagement in food and agriculture sustainability. Learn more at www.ediblecampus.web.unc.edu, and swing by for a snack!

Best of 2017-18 Music on the Porch

Can’t wait for next fall? You can enjoy some of our favorite recent Music on the Porch moments on our YouTube channel. Here’s a sampling:

Education & Resegregation Town Hall, Thurs, April 19 at 7:00 pm

Can’t attend in person? Follow along with our Livestream: https://livestream.com/accounts/10268920/AmericanSouth and Tweet us your questions @UNCSouth with the hashtag #SeparateIsUnequal.

How much racial progress has been made in America since 1955, when the U.S. Supreme Court ordered all 50 states to desegregate public schools “with all deliberate speed”? Or, as Clarence Page has asked, how much progress has been made on school desegregation since Martin Luther King, Jr was assassinated in 1968? We have invited four experts on school desegregation to share their knowledge and answer questions about disturbing trends toward school resegregation in the South. For more information about the panelists and moderator, please click here.

Tell About the South: Mishio Yamanaka, Tues, April 17 at 12:30 pm

Mishio Yamanaka, a PhD candidate in UNC’s Department of History and the 2017-18 McColl Fellow, will show how Creoles of color in New Orleans achieved the partial desegregation of public schools during Reconstruction and resisted resegregation in 1877. In her dissertation, she argues that public schools catalyzed Creoles’ civil rights debate, as they considered educational opportunities fundamental to racial equality. By examining school records and family histories, her project reveals how Creoles of color forged a community-wide desegregation campaign during the Reconstruction period.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be served.

Music on the Porch: Whyte Laundry Company, Thurs, Apr 12 at 5:30 pm

To conclude our Spring season of Music on the Porch, Bob Whyte and Laura Jones will lead a tribute to W.C. Handy and his legacy. The Whyte Laundry Company is a banjo, washboard, and gutbucket band which got its start in Connecticut many moons ago, and relocated to Chapel Hill when Whyte headed South to start up a new business. Shortly after he arrived, Bob had the good fortune to meet Laura, a classically trained vocalist whose first love was singing blues and jazz. Together they created a musical comedy show, affectionately titled “Southern Songs By Yankees.”

Performing with Laura and Bob for the first time in North Carolina are Steve Whyte (washboard) and Matt Whyte (gutbucket), who are flying down from NYC to help their Pop put on this show. Steve’s day job is editing video for television and films, but he spends his evenings as an improv performer at Magnet Theater, a storyteller for The Moth, and a professional drummer. Matt is a composer and album producer, who toured Europe and Asia with his previous indie band Earl Greyhound.

W.C. Handy needs no introduction. Early in his blues songwriting career, he was christened “Father of the Blues.” Come out and listen on April 12th, and you’ll understand why. This event is free and open to the public, and parking is free after 5:00 pm in the Park Place parking lot, approximately two blocks from the Center.