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Posts tagged ‘Poetry reading’

Rocket Launch!

Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum as we celebrate the publication of Gabrielle Calvocoressi‘s new book of poetry, Rocket Fantastic. Calvocoressi teaches creative writing at UNC-Chapel Hill, and she recently assumed duties as poetry editor for Southern Cultures. We’ll also hear some poetry by Tyree Daye, longtime editor of Raleigh Review and author of What You and The Devil Do to Stay Warm (2015).

While she was working on the manuscript, the author shared some insights with the Boston Review: “There are three ‘speakers’ in the manuscript: a young man who is deployed in a jungle war in the late 1960s, his sister who is living in the Hollywood Hills, and the bandleader with whom she has become involved (whose band is called Rocket Fantastic). I’m not sure how it will turn all out but there’s something in the variation of voices and the way pieces manage to live in a kind of mystery that resists clear narrative while still telling a story that feels intimate and deeply challenging for me as a writer. And that’s all I want from my work: to push me to a place where failure is always possible and sometimes really wonderful things occur that transform me.”

You can read excerpts from the book here, and you can buy it now from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or your favorite local bookstore. Extra credit for anyone who finishes the book before the party!

Music on the Porch: Lenard D. Moore & University of Mount Olive Jazz Band

UMO_jazz_band

Join us at the Center for an inspirational evening of poetry and jazz! The University of Mount Olive Jazz Band, directed by Dr. William Ford, will perform classic jazz standards.  Discover the essentials of jazz music improvisation and techniques combined with the poetic voice as a jazz instrument.

Poet, essayist, and playwright Lenard D. Moore is Associate Professor of English at the University of Mount Olive. He was the first African American President of the Haiku Society of America. Moore founded the MooreCarolina African American Writers Collective, and was co-founder of Washington Street Writers Group. He received the North Carolina Award for Public Literature in 2014, and his work has been featured in Southern Cultures.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Sacred Spaces Art Reception

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please join us at the Center as we unveil our Spring 2015 art exhibit, “Sacred Spaces: A Look Inside the Home of Harlem Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer.”

These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. In addition to a performance by local musicians from the Durham Symphony Orchestra, the reception will include remarks by Professor Greene, photographer John M. Hall, and Spencer’s granddaughter, Shaun Spencer-Hester, who currently serves as curator for the Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum. North Carolina poet Jeffery Beam will read a small selection from Spencer’s work.

You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here. This event, which was made possible by the generosity of Tom Kenan, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Sacred Spaces Art Reception, Thurs, Feb 5 at 5:30 pm

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please join us at the Center as we unveil our Spring 2015 art exhibit, “Sacred Spaces: A Look Inside the Home of Harlem Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer.”

These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. In addition to a performance by local musicians from the Durham Symphony Orchestra, the reception will include remarks by Professor Greene, photographer John M. Hall, and Spencer’s granddaughter, Shaun Spencer-Hester, who currently serves as curator for the Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum. North Carolina poet Jeffery Beam will read a small selection from Spencer’s work. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This event, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibit

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please stop by the Center and check out our Spring 2015 art exhibit. These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This exhibit, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public.