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Posts tagged ‘Oral history’

Tell About the South: Darius Scott & Rachel Cotterman

Scott_Cotterman

Back Ways and “Good Roads”

Southern Oral History Program field scholars Darius Scott and Rachel Cotterman explore recent findings from Back Ways, an SOHP project that examines the relationship between infrastructure development and experiences of racial segregation in the rural American South. Their talk will focus on the activities of the North Carolina “Good Roads Movement,” Good_Roadsan influential Progressive Era (1890s-1920s) reform project that worked to improve rural roads. The movement was shaped by both appeals to historic agrarian racism and commitments to scientific objectivity. The result was a supposedly unbiased plan that effectively institutionalized inequitable road development. This talk will address the challenges and possibilities of combining archival research and oral history in exploring the rural South as shaped by public policy and lived experience.

This talk is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be provided.

Tell About the South: Darius Scott & Rachel Cotterman, Tues, March 28 at 12:30 pm

Scott_Cotterman

Back Ways and “Good Roads”

 

Southern Oral History Program field scholars Darius Scott and Rachel Cotterman explore recent findings from Back Ways, an SOHP project that examines the relationship between infrastructure development and experiences of racial segregation in the rural American South. Their talk will focus on the activities of the North Carolina “Good Roads Movement,” Good_Roadsan influential Progressive Era (1890s-1920s) reform project that worked to improve rural roads. The movement was shaped by both appeals to historic agrarian racism and commitments to scientific objectivity. The result was a supposedly unbiased plan that effectively institutionalized inequitable road development. This talk will address the challenges and possibilities of combining archival research and oral history in exploring the rural South as shaped by public policy and lived experience.

This talk is free and open to the public, but RSVPs to pathorn@unc.edu will be appreciated. Light refreshments will be provided.

Hutchins Lecture: E. Patrick Johnson on Black Southern Queer Women

In our first Hutchins Lecture of the semester, “The Beekeeper: Collecting Oral Histories of Black Southern Queer Women,” E. Patrick Johnson will discuss the methodological challenges he faced while conducting research about women as a man. He’ll also perform excerpts from the oral histories he collected.

epjJohnson is Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity, and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History. He is the editor of Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood (Michigan UP, 2013) and co-editor (with Mae G. Henderson) of Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology and (with Ramon Rivera-Servera) of solo/black/woman: scripts, interviews, and essays and Blacktino Queer Performance (Duke UP, 2016).

This lecture, co-sponsored by the Department of Communication and the LGBTQ Center, will be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall. Free and open to the public.

New Roots Receives Award from the Oral History Association

In 1993, the Oral History Association established a series of awards to recognize outstanding achievement in oral history. We are delighted and honored to announce that New Roots/Nuevas Raíces: Voices from Carolina del Norte is the recipient of the 2016 Elizabeth B. Mason Project Award (Major Project). Congratulations and many thanks to our wonderful colleagues at the Southern Oral History Program, who is a major partner in New Roots, and at the Latino Migration Project in the Institute for the Study of the Americas and in University Libraries. This project is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Read more and learn about other award recipients here.

SOHP Final Presentations

Rachel Seidman’s students have been investigating stories about Race, Gender, and Entrepreneurship, exploring themes such as motivations for entrepreneurship, training and education, attitudes toward debt and credit, the role of families, and connections to wider communities and social movements. They will present their research findings on Thursday, May 5th, at 4:00 pm in the Love House & Hutchins Forum.

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