Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Live music’

Music on the Porch: Counterclockwise String Band

counterclockwise

Hailing from points as distant as Montgomery, Alabama and Winneconne, Wisconsin, Counterclockwise String Band is (L-R) Tad Smith (dobro), Alan Barnosky (guitar, vocals), Palmyra Romeo (bass), Michael Malek (banjo), and Robert Thornhill (mandolin). Bridging the traditional and the progressive, this Triangle-based quintet offers its own unique interpretations of time-tested melodies. You can enjoy their tunes on YouTube or their website.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Music on the Porch: Eric Przedpelski & Friends

LoveHouseGigPhoto

The premiere Spring show of the Center’s Music on the Porch series will be a tribute to the soul of the late, great David “Fathead” Newman. While some may not recognize his name, most recognize his sound, made famous by numerous Ray Charles hits from the 1950s and 60s. Connecting in their early twenties, Newman and Charles played together for twelve years. Their recordings from those years have been a major influence on the musical journey of saxophonist Eric Przedpelski, who looks forward to sharing some of Fathead’s favorite songs.

Przedpelski will be joined by Mark Templeton (piano) and Nat Reeves (bass), who have played together since their youth. Templeton enjoyed early success, sharing the stage with jazz legends Dizzy Gillespie, Freddie Hubbard, Woody Shaw, and Kenny Garrett. Reeves is one of the most widely respected jazz bassists in history, having toured and recorded with Sonny Stitt, Jackie McLean, Kenny Garrett, Pharaoh Sanders, Pat Metheney, John Scofield, and Curtis Fuller. Joining the group on drums is one the most respected drummers from the Triangle Area, Jake Buchanan.

Please come out and join us for this historic evening!

Process Series Opening Reception

ProcessJoin us at the Center as we kick off the 2016-17 season of UNC’s Process Series. Dedicated to the development of new and significant works in the performing arts, the Series features professionally mounted, developmental presentations of new works in progress. Its mission is to illuminate the ways in which artistic ideas take form, to examine the creative process, to offer audiences the opportunity to follow artists and performers as they explore and discover, and to enrich the development process for artists with the ultimate goals of better art and a closer relationship between artists and audiences.

Process_Riolab-26

Your Desires in Fragments, Sept 30 / Oct 1

This reception will include live music by Nicholas DiEugenio as well as comments by Process Series Director Joseph Megel, Communication Department chair Pat Parker, and Senior Associate Dean for Fine Arts & Humanities Terry Rhodes. We’ll also enjoy a sneak peek of an upcoming performance. This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Music on the Porch: Faculty Jazz Quintet, Thurs, April 21 at 5:30 pm

Join us at the Center for another performance by five stars from UNC’s outstanding jazz program. The quintet will perform “Songs We Know” from the Great American Songbook. UNC’s Faculty Jazz Quintet features Stephen Anderson on piano, Scott Sawyer on guitar, Juan Álamo on vibes, Jason Foureman on bass, and Dan Davis on the drums.

Faculty-jazz

The UNC Jazz Studies program serves a growing undergraduate student population through a variety of courses in jazz history, improvisation, harmony, and composition/arranging. In addition to these classes, the program’s Summer Jazz Workshop continues to draw high school, collegiate, and adult learners from across North Carolina and beyond. Listen to tracks from Stephen Anderson’s 360 Jazz Initiative or watch a clip from last year’s Music on the Porch performance here.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Music on the Porch: Kidznotes

Kidznotes1

Kidznotes is a Triangle-based non-profit organization that seeks to use music as a catalyst for social change, offering free instruction in classical music to students from low-income communities. Studies show that music training is positively associated with more complex brain development, higher school achievement, and other social, economic, and emotional advantages. Research also suggests that the earlier the introduction to music, the greater the benefit. Kidznotes serves children in the years most crucial to their brain and behavioral development, aspiring to “change the life trajectory of underserved K-12 students through orchestral training.”

CSAS is proud to host the Kidznotes Ambassadors All-Star Quartet (7th grade) and the Vivaldi-Copland Band (3rd-7th grade). The ensembles will play a variety of classical and popular pieces inspired by this year’s theme, “Dream Big.” This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!