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Co-sponsored Event: And So We Walked, Nov 13-14, 2015

AndSoWeWalkedIn this performance with the Process Series, Cherokee actor and writer DeLanna Studi explores the enduring impact of the Trail of Tears on contemporary communities using research, interviews, and her own family’s experience. Along with her father and a documentarian, DelannaStudi retraced the steps of her ancestors from their homestead in Murphy, North Carolina to their present home near Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

The Trail of Tears may be a defining moment of Cherokee history, but does it define us as a people? Do we live in the past or do we focus on the future? Studi will spend a month in residency at UNC-Chapel Hill turning her firsthand research on the Trail into an original dramatic work. Corey Madden directs this intimate yet communal journey of loss and renewal. This program is co-sponsored by the American Indian Center and the Southern Oral History Program. Both shows, which are free and open to the public, will begin at 8:00 pm in the Black Box Theatre in Swain Hall.

Music on the Porch: Scrapyard, Thurs, Oct 1 at 5:30 pm

Viterbini and Turchi pic

ScrapYard by Reed Turchi & Adriano ViterbiniThis international collaboration features noted guitarists Adriano Viterbini from Rome and Reed Turchi from Memphis. The duo’s exploration of styles and sounds began with an impromptu performance in 2013, and they have since toured and recorded in the U.S. and Italy. The two have a minimalist, dark blues chemistry overflowing with Delta slide and pulsing electric guitar–or, as Mojo Station reports, “Scrapyard consta di otto brani in cui la matrice sonora è data dal Blues nelle sue forme Hill-Country e Delta, a cui si aggiungono elementi di American-Primitive Music ed una spiccata attitudine cinematografica.” You can listen to sample tracks on ReverbNation and Bandcamp.

This event is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Southern Research Circle Poster Session, Fri, Sept 25 at 4:00 pm

IMG_0277Join us for an informal poster session as we learn about summer research funded by CSAS grants and fellowships. Successful applicants investigated a new southern language community (the Karen people of Chapel Hill and Carrboro, originally from Myanmar); worked to preserve archival documents from the historic black town of Mound Bayou, Mississippi; tracked regional changes in IMG_0299southern biodiversity from space; examined textile mill redevelopment and “moral rehabilitation” at southern prisons, and much more.

Come and share their findings, as well as some tasty morsels from our friends at The Root Cellar. This event is free and open to the public.

Music on the Porch: Eric Przedpelski Quartet, Thurs, Sept 24 at 5:30 pm

WildGooseChaseJoin us at the Love House for one of the hottest jazz acts in the Triangle. The quartet includes bandleader Eric Przedpelski on saxophone, David Klingman on piano, Philip Norris on bass, and Atticus Reynolds on drums. Fresh off a summer concert series in New Jersey, the quartet will celebrate the release of their debut album, Wild Goose Chase.

This event is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!Przedpelski Quartet

Hutchins Lecture: Sam W. Haynes, Wed, Sept 16 at 4:30 pm

Join us in the Pleasants Room at Wilson Library for the first James and Marguerite Hutchins Lecture of 2015-16, as Dr. Sam W. Haynes presents a lecture on “Unbecoming Southern: The Roots of Texas Exceptionalism.”

haynesMany Texas historians have argued that the bitter experience of the Civil War prompted white Texans in later years to downplay their southern roots. In an effort to disassociate the state from the trauma of the Lost Cause, they tailored their historical memory to give greater emphasis to the region’s frontier heritage. In so doing, they laid claim to an artificial brand of exceptionalism, constructing an elaborate and ennobling mythology around the exploits of Anglo-Texans in their conflicts with Mexicans and Native Americans. However, Anglo-Texan men and women sought to craft a new identity for the state in strikingly different ways. This lecture will examine efforts to rebrand Texas in the early twentieth century, emphasizing the gendered dimensions of a process in which women’s organizations, such as the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, and male business leaders offered their own distinct interpretations of the state’s past.

Sam W. Haynes is a professor of History and director of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies at UT-Arlington. Specializing in Jacksonian America, 19th century Texas, and the American Southwest, he is the author of three books, including Unfinished Revolution: Unfinished RevolutionThe Early American Republic in a British World, a study of nineteenth century American attitudes toward Great Britain, and James K. Polk and the Expansionist Impulse. He is the editor of an anthology of essays, Contested Empire: Rethinking the Texas Revolution, which was published last month by Texas A&M University Press. His current book project examines Anglo, Mexican, and Native American conflict in Texas during the early nineteenth century.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.