Skip to content

Music on the Porch: Shirlette Ammons & jocElyn Ellis, Thursday, August 28 at 5:30 pm

Come help us kick off our 2014-15 Music on the Porch series with North Carolina hip-hop/funk rebels Shirlette Ammons and jocElyn Ellis. In addition to their groundbreaking solo work, both musicians are part of the Next Level hip-hop diplomacy program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and directed by UNC Music professor Mark Katz. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!  

Shirlette AmmonsShirlette Ammons is a Mt. Olive native and Durham-based poet and musician who also directs a youth arts program. Her recent projects include And Lovers Like, a collaborative album with the Dynamite Brothers, and Matching Skin, a poetry collection from Carolina Wren Press. Ammons’s debut solo album, Twilight for Gladys Bentley, updated and reinterpreted the unsung blues singer who defied sexual and gender norms while putting on some of the hippest performances during Harlem’s Jazz Age.

Jocelyn EllisCharlotte-area singer/ songwriter jocElyn Ellis’s soulful voice and writing talent also combine for a powerful mix. jocElyn released her crowdfunded debut album, Life of a Hologram, in November 2013. She has performed around the world with Wyclef Jean, Everclear, and her previous band, The Alpha Theory. She recently launched a new songwriting project, The Apple Seed Society. Come see this amazing duo next Thursday!

Deltra Tate named Administrative Manager of CSAS

Deltra2The Center for the Study of the American South proudly announces Deltra Tate as our new Administrative Manager and Events Coordinator. Her appointment began on July 7, 2014. Tate comes to the Center from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, where she served as a staff specialist in the Admissions Department.

“Deltra Tate brings expertise in human resources management and event planning to the Center,” said Kenneth Janken, Interim Director of the Center.  “A native and life-long resident of Durham and a product of North Carolina’s public schools, Deltra has earned both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business administration.  With her varied experiences in higher education and private industry, Deltra is certain to ensure the smooth running of the Center and its programming.”

Tell About the South: Kathleen DuVal, Tuesday, September 23 at 12:30 pm

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Kathleen DuVal, Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. DuVal’s talk, titled “Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution,”  focuses on the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. Based on her research for a forthcoming book by the same title, “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences, including incorporation into a rising American republic.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Frank R. Baumgartner, Tuesday, October 7 at 12:30 pm

BaumgartnerPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Frank R. Baumgartner, the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.  Baumgartner is co-author of The Decline of the Death Penalty and the Discovery of Innocence, and since coming to Carolina he has researched the death penalty’s demise nationally as well as in North Carolina.  With colleagues Isaac Unah (Political Science) and Seth Kotch (American Studies), he is working on a book tentatively titled A Deadly Symbol: Race and Capital Punishment in North Carolina. Baumgartner also teaches a course on Race, Innocence, and the End of the Death Penalty (POLI 203) which currently has 240 students enrolled.  Associated with that is a speakers series on the death penalty with eight speakers including the family of Troy Davis, several exonerated inmates from North Carolina and their attorneys, and others; these events are open to the public throughout the fall semester.

Baumgartner will speak about the racial aspects of North Carolina’s death penalty and the relevance of the Racial Justice Act’s passage (2009), revision (2011) and demise (2013).  These events make clear that the politics of race, innocence, and the death penalty remain fundamental in our state.  At the same time, use of the punishment has never been very common and in recent years has declined so much that it has become almost entirely symbolic (no one has been executed since 2006, and only 1 death sentence has been handed down, state-wide, since 2011).  But what a powerful symbol it is.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

2014 Moxie Scholars Give Final Presentation

Moxies

On Friday, July 11, the 2014 Moxie Scholars presented a short video, a group mural, and an interactive dialogue with participants from the summer seminar. These six undergraduates discussed their internships with community organizations in the Triangle area, as well as their study of the history of women’s rights. They unveiled a collectively painted mural of Ella Baker, reflecting Baker’s philosophy of participatory democracy and her work as a Chapel Hill-based organizer during the Civil Rights Movement.