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2014 Charleston Lecture by James E. Ferguson II, Tuesday, November 11 at 7:00 pm

fergie2Groundbreaking civil rights lawyer James E. Ferguson II presented the 2014 Charleston Lecture in Southern Affairs, titled “Fifty Years of Civil Rights Litigation–Everything is Different–But Not Much Has Changed.” Co-sponsored by UNC School of Law, the Center for Civil Rights, the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, and the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, this lecture addressed the legacy of the Voting Rights Act, fifty years after its passage.

James E. Ferguson II was a founding partner, along with Julius L. Chambers, of the firm Ferguson, Stein, Chambers, Gresham and Sumter, P.A.  He has served as President of the firm since 1984. He has held teaching positions at Harvard Law School and North Carolina Central Law School. He served as a Scholar in Residence at Santa Clara Law School and was recognized as an Honorary Fellow by the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He has been recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the nation’s top ten litigators and has been listed in every edition of The Best Lawyers in America. He is a member of the Inner Circle of Advocates, an exclusive organization whose membership is limited to 100 of the nation’s top trial lawyers.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

Call for Proposals: State of the Plate, due November 15!

Our 2015 Global American South conference will focus on “The State of the Plate: Food and the Local/Global Nexus.” Co-sponsored by the Center for Global Initiatives, the Global Research Institute, the Department of American Studies, and the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, the conference will be held March 27-28, 2015 in the FedEx Global Education Center.

Presentations will focus on specific southern flavors and ingredients, broadly defined, as both concept and reality in the American South. Each session will include respondents who are engaged in the practical aspects of food today, including farmers, chefs, entrepreneurs, and community leaders.

The deadline for our Call for Proposals is November 15, 2014. Please send proposals as well as any questions to plate@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Frank R. Baumgartner, Tuesday, October 28 at 12:30 pm

BaumgartnerPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Frank R. Baumgartner, the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.  Baumgartner is co-author of The Decline of the Death Penalty and the Discovery of Innocence, and since coming to Carolina he has researched the death penalty’s demise nationally as well as in North Carolina.  With colleagues Isaac Unah (Political Science) and Seth Kotch (American Studies), he is working on a book tentatively titled A Deadly Symbol: Race and Capital Punishment in North Carolina. Baumgartner also teaches a course on Race, Innocence, and the End of the Death Penalty (POLI 203) which currently has 240 students enrolled.  Associated with that is a speakers series on the death penalty with eight speakers including the family of Troy Davis, several exonerated inmates from North Carolina and their attorneys, and others; these events are open to the public throughout the fall semester.

Baumgartner will speak about the racial aspects of North Carolina’s death penalty and the relevance of the Racial Justice Act’s passage (2009), revision (2011) and demise (2013).  These events make clear that the politics of race, innocence, and the death penalty remain fundamental in our state.  At the same time, use of the punishment has never been very common and in recent years has declined so much that it has become almost entirely symbolic (no one has been executed since 2006, and only 1 death sentence has been handed down, state-wide, since 2011).  But what a powerful symbol it is.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Music on the Porch: Faculty Jazz Quintet, Thursday, October 23 at 5:30 pm

We’re celebrating the final Music on the Porch performance of the semester with free pizza! Join us at the Love House for an exciting performance by five of UNC’s very own jazz virtuosos. Led by Professor Jim Ketch (trumpet), the quintet also includes Professors Stephen Anderson (piano), Juan Alamo (vibes), Jason Foureman (bass) and Dan Davis (drums). Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Faculty_jazz

The UNC Jazz Studies area serves a growing undergraduate student population through a variety of classroom courses in jazz history, improvisation, harmony, and composition/arranging. A highly successful Summer Jazz Workshop is attracting high school, collegiate, and adult learners from across NC and beyond. Students perform in the UNC Jazz Band, 4-5 Jazz Combos, and Charanga Carolina. Students also have the opportunity to perform with distinguished guest jazz artists. Recent guests have included Kate McGarry, Dave Pietro, Luis Bonilla, Eric Alexander, Rodney Whitaker, Marcus Roberts, Jason Marsalis, Dave Stryker, Joel Frahm, Joe Magnarelli, Gary Smulyan, Scott Wendholt, Steve Wilson, and many others. The UNC Jazz Band and Jazz Combos have recorded 4 compact disks and Charanga Carolina recently released their second recording.

Tell About the South: Sharon Holland, Tuesday, October 21 at 12:30 pm

slj_coverSharon P. Holland (Editor), along with Managing Editor Kathleen Crosby, will speak about their work transitioning SLJ (The Southern Literary Journal) from the Department of English & Comparative Literature to UNC’s Department of American Studies. Taking a very well-known journal from its home in literary studies to a journal with interdisciplinary content is no small feat, and the editors will outline their process as well as sharing their thoughts on Southern Studies, the publishing industry, and contemporary scholarship in American Studies, more broadly.

Holland

Holland is a graduate of Princeton University (1986) and holds a PhD in English and African American Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1992). She is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and (Black) Subjectivity  (Duke UP, 2000), which won the Lora Romero First Book Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA) in 2002. She is also co-author of a collection of trans-Atlantic Afro-Native criticism with Professor Tiya Miles (American Culture, UM, Ann Arbor) entitled Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country (Duke UP, 2006). Professor Holland is also responsible for bringing a feminist classic, The Queen is in the Garbage by Lila Karp to the attention of The Feminist Press (Summer 2007) for publication (2007). She is the author of The Erotic Life of Racism (Duke UP, 2012), a theoretical project that explores the intersection of Critical Race, Feminist, and Queer Theory. She is also at work on the final draft of another book project entitled simply, “little black girl.” You can see her work on food, writing and all things equestrian on her blog, theprofessorstable.wordpress.com. She is currently at work on a new project, “Perishment”: an investigation of the human/animal distinction and the place of discourse on blackness within that discussion. She is presently Professor in and Associate Chair of the Department of American Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

This event is co-sponsored by UNC Press. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.