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Tell About the South: Kathleen DuVal, Tuesday, September 23 at 12:30 pm

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Kathleen DuVal, Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. DuVal’s talk, titled “Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution,”  focuses on the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. Based on her research for a forthcoming book by the same title, “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences, including incorporation into a rising American republic.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Frank R. Baumgartner, Tuesday, October 7 at 12:30 pm

BaumgartnerPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Frank R. Baumgartner, the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.  Baumgartner is co-author of The Decline of the Death Penalty and the Discovery of Innocence, and since coming to Carolina he has researched the death penalty’s demise nationally as well as in North Carolina.  With colleagues Isaac Unah (Political Science) and Seth Kotch (American Studies), he is working on a book tentatively titled A Deadly Symbol: Race and Capital Punishment in North Carolina. Baumgartner also teaches a course on Race, Innocence, and the End of the Death Penalty (POLI 203) which currently has 240 students enrolled.  Associated with that is a speakers series on the death penalty with eight speakers including the family of Troy Davis, several exonerated inmates from North Carolina and their attorneys, and others; these events are open to the public throughout the fall semester.

Baumgartner will speak about the racial aspects of North Carolina’s death penalty and the relevance of the Racial Justice Act’s passage (2009), revision (2011) and demise (2013).  These events make clear that the politics of race, innocence, and the death penalty remain fundamental in our state.  At the same time, use of the punishment has never been very common and in recent years has declined so much that it has become almost entirely symbolic (no one has been executed since 2006, and only 1 death sentence has been handed down, state-wide, since 2011).  But what a powerful symbol it is.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Music on the Porch: Joe Troop & Diego Sánchez, Thursday, October 9 at 5:30 pm

Troop & Sanchez tourWhen self-described “North Carolina-born banjoist, fiddler, singer-songwriter and nomad” Joe Troop graduated from UNC and moved to Buenos Aires, says his bandmate Diego Sánchez, “he ruined everything.” Before that, Sánchez had claimed to be “the only banjo player in Argentina.” Now the acoustic world-music duo is returning stateside for their first U.S. tour, funded in part by a Kickstarter campaign. Join us on the porch at the Love House for a blend of traditional North Carolina and Latin American music, inspired 5,000 miles away. This event is free and open to the public.

Hutchins Lecture: Rebecca J. Scott, Tuesday, October 14 at 4:30 pm

rebecca scottIn her Hutchins Lecture, titled “Tracing Atlantic Revolutions: One Family’s Itinerary,” Professor Scott will talk about the research that went into the writing of her recent book (coauthored with Jean M. Hébrard) Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (Harvard UP, 2012; paperback, August 2014), which traces one family’s interaction with law and official documents across five generations.  The story begins in West Africa with the enslavement of a woman named Rosalie, then follows her to the French Caribbean at the time of the Haitian Revolution. Rosalie’s daughter Elisabeth later settled in Louisiana, but in the face of hostility to free persons of color, the family migrated to France. Two of Elisabeth’s sons then returned to Louisiana to become equal-rights activists during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Piecing together this family’s history helps to place Reconstruction in the southern United States into a transnational perspective, with threads continuing into 20th-century Europe.

Rebecca J. Scott is the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. At the Law School, she teaches a course on civil rights and the boundaries of citizenship in historical perspective, as well as a seminar on the law in slavery and freedom. Freedom Papers has been awarded the 2012 Albert Beveridge Book Award in American History and the James Rawley Book Prize in Atlantic History, both from the American Historical Association. The book also has been awarded the 2013 Chinard Prize from the Society for French Historical Studies and the Institut Français d’Amerique. Scott received an AB from Radcliffe College, an MPhil in economic history from the London School of Economics, and a PhD in history from Princeton University. She has held the Guggenheim Fellowship and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

2014 Moxie Scholars Give Final Presentation

Moxies

On Friday, July 11, the 2014 Moxie Scholars presented a short video, a group mural, and an interactive dialogue with participants from the summer seminar. These six undergraduates discussed their internships with community organizations in the Triangle area, as well as their study of the history of women’s rights. They unveiled a collectively painted mural of Ella Baker, reflecting Baker’s philosophy of participatory democracy and her work as a Chapel Hill-based organizer during the Civil Rights Movement.