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Posts from the ‘Tell About the South’ Category

Tell About the South: Kyle T. Mays, Tues, Feb 9 at 12:30

Rebel-Music

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion titled “From Red Power to Hip Hop: The Urban Indigenous Experience in Postwar America.” Indigenous people and urban spaces are often rendered incompatible in both historical and contemporary scholarship. Along this line of thinking, Native people are “pre-modern” while cities are “modern,” thus Native people exist outside of modernity. And yet, they have always been in cities and engaged with urban culture. They were influenced by and helped shape urban culture for the last several decades in significant ways. Spanning the late 20th and early 21st centuries, this talk explores the links between the Red Power movement and the most significant cultural movement since that time: the emergence of Hip Hop in Indigenous North America. Two questions frame my talk. What role did urban culture play in the shaping of the Red Power movement? What is the link between the Red Power movement and Indigenous Hip Hop today? Using Critical Indigenous Studies frameworks, this talk argues that Native people, long fighting the colonial baggage of invisibility, have used urban spaces and cultures to help assert their humanity as modern Indigenous people in postwar America.

kylemaysKyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Chippewa) is a transdisciplinary scholar of modern U.S. history, urban history, indigenous studies, and comparative ethnic studies. As a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at UNC-Chapel Hill, he is currently working on two projects. The first is a revised version of his dissertation, titled Indigenous Detroit: Indigeneity, Race, and Gender in the Construction of the Modern Motor City, which analyzes the role of indigeneity in the construction of 20th century Detroit. The second is a book-length manuscript titled Hip Hop Beats, Indigenous Rhymes: Modernity and Hip Hop in Indigenous North America, which is currently under contract with SUNY Press.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Bland Simpson & Ann Cary Simpson, Tues, Nov 17 at 12:30 pm

LittleRiversJoin us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Bland Simpson and Ann Cary Simpson. Bland and Ann Cary will discuss their new book, Little Rivers and Waterway Tales, which tells new tales of coastal North Carolina’s “water-loving land,” revealing how its creeks, streams, and rivers shape the region’s geography as well as its culture. Ann Cary, who contributed nearly sixty photographs to the book, joins Bland in telling the stories of those who have lived and worked in this country, chronicling a distinct environment and way of life.

TheSimpsonsBland Simpson is Kenan Distinguished Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as well as pianist for the Red Clay Ramblers. Photographer Ann Cary Simpson is a consultant with Moss + Ross of Durham and interim director of NC Catch, a nonprofit supporting fishermen and local seafood.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Evan Faulkenbury, Tues, Oct 27 at 12:30 pm

Evan Faulkenbury photoThe money to pay for the Civil Rights Movement had to come from somewhere. In this talk, Evan Faulkenbury will tell the story of the Voter Education Project (VEP) and how philanthropic foundations paid for and influenced the course of the movement during the 1960s. The VEP solicited grants from foundations, then dispersed the money to hundreds of grassroots voter registration campaigns across the eleven states of the Old Confederacy. With these grants, ranging from $200 to $20,000, local civil rights movements sprang up across the South, coalescing into the broader African American freedom struggle. The VEP was the behind-the-scenes engine of the Civil Rights Movement, empowering local activists to register people, to challenge Jim Crow at the polls, and to revolutionize southern and national politics.

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Faulkenbury, a PhD candidate in History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Field Scholar with the Southern Oral History Program. This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Evan Faulkenbury Image

Tell About the South: New Roots Latino Roundtable, Tues, Sept 8 at 12:30 pm

LMPSince 2007, faculty, staff, and students at UNC have conducted oral history interviews on issues related to Latino migration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino/a communities. This project, called New Roots / Nuevas Raíces, was awarded an NEH grant in 2014 to make the collection accessible to new regional, national, and global audiences, particularly within Spanish-speaking Latino and Latin American communities. At this “Tell About the South” discussion, hear from New Roots partners from the Latino Migration Project, the Southern Oral History Program, and University Libraries about their work creating a bilingual website and digital catalogs as well as their outreach with Latino communities, K-12 educators, and researchers internationally.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Rob Shapard, Tues, April 21 at 12:30 pm

Rob Shapard copyPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Rob Shapard, a doctoral student in U.S. History and 2014-15 McColl Fellow at CSAS. In his talk, Calculating Eye and Rough Hand: Turning Longleaf into Board Feet and Sawdust,” Shapard will describe the perspective of one sawmilling firm, the Louisiana Central Lumber Company, toward the old-growth Louisiana longleaf pine forests that it felled and milled into lumber in the early twentieth century. The language that the company used to describe longleaf and other trees, a kind of “lumber lexicon,” reveals this perspective and helps to explain the company’s effectiveness in making lumber from longleaf. The topic is one aspect of Shapard’s doctoral dissertation on attitudes toward longleaf pine across the American South. Shapard is a native of the erstwhile textile town of Griffin, Georgia, a former journalist, and a student/scholar of environmental history and oral history.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.