Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Southern Oral History Program’ Category

Apply now for grants and fellowships!

UNC graduate students, applications for the following are due on March 5th!

Applications for the Center’s 2018-19 Postdoctoral Fellowship are due on March 13th, and more information about CSAS funding opportunities is available here.

SOHP Audio Competition: The Sonic South / Persistence

Since 1973, the Southern Oral History Program has worked to preserve the voices of the southern past. We have collected more than 5,000 interviews with people from all walks of life—from mill workers to civil rights leaders to future presidents of the United States. Made available through UNC’s renowned Southern Historical Collection online, these interviews capture the vivid personalities, poignant personal stories, and behind-the-scenes decision-making that bring history to life.

In order to introduce wider audiences to this trove of Southern narratives, and to support a growing community of audio producers, we are thrilled to announce our new audio competition, The Sonic South. For our inaugural competition, we’re focusing on the theme of Persistence. Women’s voices are central to the SOHP’s collection. Their stories help us understand the social and economic changes that people across the South have experienced and initiated. Women’s leadership and activism—their persistence—have been key to many of the central movements of our time. Of course, not all women have embraced change; persistence can also mean the ongoing power of old traditions and old ways of thinking. But no matter what our politics or our outlook, all our lives have been indelibly shaped by these stories. Read more about the competition here, and learn how to submit.

Co-sponsored event: Migration Studies Social, Tues, Sept 26 at 5:15 pm

SOHP Intern Performance, Thurs, April 27, 2017 at 5:00 pm

SOHP_Interns_Spring_2017

Hutchins Lecture: E. Patrick Johnson, Thurs, Jan 26 at 4:30 pm

In this lecture, titled “The Beekeeper: Collecting Oral Histories of Black Southern Queer Women,” Johnson discussed some methodological challenges of being a man conducting research on women as well as addressing some topics that he found to be common among many of the women he interviewed. He also performed excerpts from the oral histories.

epjE. Patrick Johnson is Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity, and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History. He is the editor of Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood (Michigan UP, 2013) and co-editor (with Mae G. Henderson) of Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology and (with Ramon Rivera-Servera) of solo/black/woman: scripts, interviews, and essays and Blacktino Queer Performance (Duke UP, 2016).

This lecture was co-sponsored by the Department of Communication and the LGBTQ Center.