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Posts from the ‘Research & Scholarship’ Category

Panel on the Death Penalty in North Carolina, Thurs, Mar 2 at 4:30 pm

Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum for a discussion of the current state and politics of the death penalty. This program is offered in conjunction with the new Process Series production Count. Directed by Lynden Harris, Count will be performed on Friday, March 3 and Saturday, March 4 at 8:00 pm. More details about the play are available here.

Our panel will feature Professors Frank Baumgartner and Isaac Unah (UNC Political Science); Jennifer Thompson (author of Picking Cotton and President of Healing Justice); and Lynden Harris (Hidden Voices). This event is free and open to the public.

Count

Co-sponsored: Race and Waste in an Aluminum Town

AluminumTown

This oral history-based performance examines the history of a North Carolina aluminum town–or, really, two towns: Badin and West Badin. In addition to the personal losses experienced by the residents of these towns, the play reveals how discriminatory practices of pollution and toxic waste disposal produced disparate health outcomes for the residents of these primarily white and primarily black southern towns. We salute the courageous and compelling work of our 2016-17 McColl Fellow, Pavithra Vasudevan, as well as the community participants who had the courage to share their stories. Shows on Friday at 8:00 pm, Saturday at 8:00 pm, and Sunday at 2:00 pm.

Hutchins Lecture: Julie Reed, Thurs, Feb 16 at 4:30 pm

“What is the real basis of a public enterprise?” The Cherokee Nation and the Social Safety Net

reedIn this lecture, Reed will discuss why nineteenth-century Cherokee people chose to surrender aspects of their holistic system of care for others rooted within a matrilineal clan system and governed by local community obligations and clan responsibilities that stretched across towns in favor of nationally administered social services by the Cherokee Nation to individual citizens. This shift ultimately resulted in the creation of an orphanage, a prison, and a facility for the (dis)abled and mentally ill in the period after the Civil War.  Reed will share how Cherokee people evaluated the quality of their institutions and the conditions that led them to study and critique the social policies of states and the larger United States.reed-serving-the-nation

Julie Reed is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Her book Serving the Nation: Cherokee Sovereignty and Social Welfare, 1800-1907 was published by the University of Oklahoma Press in 2016. This lecture will be held in the Pleasants Family Room at Wilson Library. The lecture is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture: E. Patrick Johnson, Thurs, Jan 26 at 4:30 pm

In this lecture, titled “The Beekeeper: Collecting Oral Histories of Black Southern Queer Women,” Johnson discussed some methodological challenges of being a man conducting research on women as well as addressing some topics that he found to be common among many of the women he interviewed. He also performed excerpts from the oral histories.

epjE. Patrick Johnson is Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity, and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History. He is the editor of Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood (Michigan UP, 2013) and co-editor (with Mae G. Henderson) of Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology and (with Ramon Rivera-Servera) of solo/black/woman: scripts, interviews, and essays and Blacktino Queer Performance (Duke UP, 2016).

This lecture was co-sponsored by the Department of Communication and the LGBTQ Center.

Winter Issue Launch @ the Nasher

winter-cover

Join us to celebrate the Winter Issue of Southern Cultures at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Curator Trevor Schoonmaker will discuss the Nasher’s current exhibit, Southern Accent, with artists Jeff Whetstone and Stacy Lynn Waddell. Selections from the exhibit as well as a conversation with Schoonmaker, Whetstone, and Waddell are featured in the new issue.