Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Research & Scholarship’ Category

Tell About the South: Frank R. Baumgartner, Tuesday, October 28 at 12:30 pm

BaumgartnerPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Frank R. Baumgartner, the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.  Baumgartner is co-author of The Decline of the Death Penalty and the Discovery of Innocence, and since coming to Carolina he has researched the death penalty’s demise nationally as well as in North Carolina.  With colleagues Isaac Unah (Political Science) and Seth Kotch (American Studies), he is working on a book tentatively titled A Deadly Symbol: Race and Capital Punishment in North Carolina. Baumgartner also teaches a course on Race, Innocence, and the End of the Death Penalty (POLI 203) which currently has 240 students enrolled.  Associated with that is a speakers series on the death penalty with eight speakers including the family of Troy Davis, several exonerated inmates from North Carolina and their attorneys, and others; these events are open to the public throughout the fall semester.

Baumgartner will speak about the racial aspects of North Carolina’s death penalty and the relevance of the Racial Justice Act’s passage (2009), revision (2011) and demise (2013).  These events make clear that the politics of race, innocence, and the death penalty remain fundamental in our state.  At the same time, use of the punishment has never been very common and in recent years has declined so much that it has become almost entirely symbolic (no one has been executed since 2006, and only 1 death sentence has been handed down, state-wide, since 2011).  But what a powerful symbol it is.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Tell About the South: Sharon Holland, Tuesday, October 21 at 12:30 pm

slj_coverSharon P. Holland (Editor), along with Managing Editor Kathleen Crosby, will speak about their work transitioning SLJ (The Southern Literary Journal) from the Department of English & Comparative Literature to UNC’s Department of American Studies. Taking a very well-known journal from its home in literary studies to a journal with interdisciplinary content is no small feat, and the editors will outline their process as well as sharing their thoughts on Southern Studies, the publishing industry, and contemporary scholarship in American Studies, more broadly.

Holland

Holland is a graduate of Princeton University (1986) and holds a PhD in English and African American Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1992). She is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and (Black) Subjectivity  (Duke UP, 2000), which won the Lora Romero First Book Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA) in 2002. She is also co-author of a collection of trans-Atlantic Afro-Native criticism with Professor Tiya Miles (American Culture, UM, Ann Arbor) entitled Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country (Duke UP, 2006). Professor Holland is also responsible for bringing a feminist classic, The Queen is in the Garbage by Lila Karp to the attention of The Feminist Press (Summer 2007) for publication (2007). She is the author of The Erotic Life of Racism (Duke UP, 2012), a theoretical project that explores the intersection of Critical Race, Feminist, and Queer Theory. She is also at work on the final draft of another book project entitled simply, “little black girl.” You can see her work on food, writing and all things equestrian on her blog, theprofessorstable.wordpress.com. She is currently at work on a new project, “Perishment”: an investigation of the human/animal distinction and the place of discourse on blackness within that discussion. She is presently Professor in and Associate Chair of the Department of American Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

This event is co-sponsored by UNC Press. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Hutchins Lecture: Rebecca J. Scott, Tuesday, October 14 at 4:30 pm

rebecca scottProfessor Scott’s Hutchins Lecture, titled “Tracing Atlantic Revolutions: One Family’s Itinerary,” will address the research that went into her recent book Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (Harvard UP, 2012; paperback, August 2014), which traces one family’s interaction with law and official documents across five generations.  The story begins in West Africa with the enslavement of a woman named Rosalie, then follows her to the French Caribbean at the time of the Haitian Revolution. Rosalie’s daughter Elisabeth later settled in Louisiana, but in the face of hostility to free persons of color, the family migrated to France. Two of Elisabeth’s sons then returned to Louisiana to become equal-rights activists during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Piecing together this family’s history helps to place Reconstruction in the southern United States into a transnational perspective, with threads continuing into 20th-century Europe. This lecture will be held at the Pleasants Room in UNC’s Wilson Library.

Rebecca J. Scott is the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. At the Law School, she teaches a course on civil rights and the boundaries of citizenship in historical perspective, as well as a seminar on the law in slavery and freedom. Freedom Papers has been awarded the 2012 Albert Beveridge Book Award in American History and the James Rawley Book Prize in Atlantic History, both from the American Historical Association. The book also has been awarded the 2013 Chinard Prize from the Society for French Historical Studies and the Institut Français d’Amerique. Scott received an AB from Radcliffe College, an MPhil in economic history from the London School of Economics, and a PhD in history from Princeton University. She has held the Guggenheim Fellowship and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

SOHP members presenting research at Oral History Association conference, October 8-12

09202014_JaquelynDowdHall_retirement200-L

The Southern Oral History Program  staff is currently attending the Oral History Association Annual Meeting in Madison, Wisconsin. SOHP faculty, staff, and students are addressing a variety of topics–from digital methodologies to activism in academia. Director Malinda Lowery will also screen her award-winning film Private Violence. If you’re in Madison, check out their presentations and take part in conversations about the current state of oral history.

Emerging Methodologies in Oral History, Panel
Thu, October 9, 8:30 to 10:00am, Madison Concourse Hotel, 1, Senate A
Oral Histories on Display: Curating a Physical and Digital Exhibit for the SOHP’s 40th Anniversary, Jaycie Vos

Charting Future Directions for Oral History Projects, Panel
Thu, October 9, 3:00 to 4:30pm, Madison Concourse Hotel, 2, Conference II
Beth Millwood (Chair), Rob Shapard

Academics as Activists, Plenary
Fri, October 10, 10:15 to 11:45am, Madison Concourse Hotel, 2, Wisconsin
Rachel Seidman and Jacquelyn Dowd Hall

Film screening of Private Violence
Fri, October 10, 7:30 to 9:30pm, Madison Public Library, Community Room
Malinda Maynor Lowery

Recording Voices and Empowering Communities: Oral History, Community Engagement, and Social Justice, Roundtable
Sat, October 11, 8:30 to 10:00am, Madison Concourse Hotel, 1, Senate B
Hannah Gill (Chair), Sarah  McNamara

Moving to Reach Our (Full, Digital) Potential, Roundtable
Sat, October 11, 10:15 to 11:45am, Madison Concourse Hotel, 2, University A
Jaycie Vos, Seth Kotch, Virginia Ferris

Women in Motion: Examinations of Women’s Activism, Panel
Sat, October 11, 3:00 to 4:30pm, Madison Concourse Hotel, 2, University C
Chair: Malinda Maynor Lowery

Stories of Shape and Motion: Perspectives on Creating and Curating Audiovisual Collections of the Long Black Freedom Struggle, Panel
Sun, October 12, 9:30 to 11:00am, Madison Concourse Hotel, 2, University B
Negotiating the Boundaries: The Pragmatics of Managing Oral History Projects, Seth Kotch

Above, SOHP staff: Jaycie Vos, Rachel Seidman, Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, Malinda Maynor Lowery, and Rachel Olsen.

Southern Research Circle poster session, Friday, October 3 at 2:00 pm

NavarreteStop by the Love House & Hutchins Forum to learn about twelve summer research projects funded by the Center. Our Southern Research Circle — graduate students in History, Anthropology, English & Comparative Literature, American Studies, City & Regional Planning, Environment & Ecology, Statistics & Operational Research, and the School of Education — will present their findings in poster format.

Come learn about a range of exciting projects at the cutting edge of Southern Studies. From baptism rituals in Gullah culture to bioarcheology in North Carolina cemeteries to the “Mississippi modernism” of Charles Henri Ford, these presentations showcase some of UNC’s best and brightest young scholars at the beginning of their promising careers.

posters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.