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Posts from the ‘Research & Scholarship’ Category

Hutchins Lecture: Leslie Bow, Thurs, Jan 29 at 4:30 pm

Bow_Leslie_port10_8556Where did the Asian sit on the segregated bus? Drawing from her book, ‘Partly Colored': Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, Leslie Bow traces narratives that attempted to reconcile Asian Americans to segregation’s distinction between black and white.

Investigating the ways in which racially “in-between” subjects and communities were understood within the South, Bow locates Asian American representation in visual culture and memoir as a site of cultural anxiety and negotiation.  What she uncovers is not so much an alternative account of white supremacy, but a genealogy of repressed dissonance that has consequence for the ways that we remember the Jim Crow era and its legacy. This lecture will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039 Graham Memorial Hall).

Partly_ColoredLeslie Bow is Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the author of ‘Partly Colored’ (NYU Press, 2010) and Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion (Princeton UP, 2001), as well as the editor of the four-volume collection Asian American Feminisms (Routledge, 2012). Bow has served as Director of Asian American Studies, on the editorial board of American Literature, and on the Executive Committee of the Modern Language Association (MLA). Her current book project examines fantasy portrayals of race.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture by Sophie White, Thurs, Feb 19 at 4:30 pm

sophiewhiteIn her lecture, “Beyond the Slave Narrative,” Sophie White showcases the judicial testimony of enslaved Africans in criminal trials in French colonial Louisiana. Drawing on her current research project, White locates the verbal and non-verbal stories which enslaved individuals, forced into a global African diaspora, sought somehow to narrate. Reading past the details of the criminal cases, and interspersing her analysis with excerpts from their testimonies, she focuses on individual slaves’s subjectivity as conveyed through their inflections and uses of imagery, their choice of words and their silences. This lecture will be held in the Kresge Foundation Room (039 Graham Memorial Hall).

Wild Frenchmen

Sophie White is Associate Professor of American Studies, Africana Studies, and History at the University of Notre Dame. She describes herself as an “historian of early America with an interdisciplinary focus on cultural encounters between Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans, and a commitment to Atlantic and global research perspectives.” Professor White is the author of Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana (University of Pennsylvania Press, McNeil Center for Early American Studies series, 2012), which demonstrates that material culture–especially dress–was central to the elaboration of discourses about race in French colonial Louisiana. Her current book project, “Voices of the African Diaspora Within and Beyond the Atlantic World,” is centered on the analysis of an extraordinary body of testimony by enslaved Africans in colonial Louisiana and beyond. Both book projects were supported by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tell About the South: Emilio del Valle Escalante, Wednesday, March 25 at 12:30 pm

EmilioWhat role have Maya writers and their literatures played in the affirmation of indigenous cultural identity and the struggle for indigenous rights and self-determination in Guatemala since the 1960s? Please join us for a lunchtime discussion with Emilio del Valle Escalante, Assistant Professor of Spanish in UNC’s Department of Romance Studies, on “Maya Literary Resurgence in Guatemala.”

Professor Escalante will answer the question above by offering a critical discussion of the poetry of Kaqchikel Maya authors Francisco Morales Santos and Luis de Lión. Given that the context of the 1960s defines the beginning of a 36-year-long civil war, he argues that Morales Santos and Lión respond to that experience as well as the interest of the Guatemalan left in incorporating the Maya population into the armed struggle. These Kaqchikel authors embrace the socialist ideal proposed by the Guatemalan left while using the left to propose and build a political space to articulate their own Maya national liberation; that is, their poetry speaks of revolution and socialism as well as Maya cultural/national vindication and decolonization.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Southern Cultures Double Issue Release Party, Thursday, December 4 at 5:30 pm

whale cover

Please join us at the Center as we celebrate the release of two new issues of Southern Cultures! The Winter 2014 issue examines southern politics, dashboard poets, the caning of Charles Sumner, and the “harmless, humorous hick” persona of Gomer Pyle (as well as the actor who came to inhabit that persona). You’ll find photographs by Michael W. Panhorst, poetry by Joseph Bathanti, and important pointers for how to catch and smoke the tastiest eels.

sc best of food draft

 

We’re simultaneously launching our first-ever Best of Food issue, which collects some of our favorite writing on southern food and foodways. Inside you’ll find essays on Native food in the Native South, eating with “molasses-colored glasses,” an early twentieth century “Girls’ Tomato Club,” and more. Order your copy today, or go all out and order the whole tote bag!

April McGreger of Farmer’s Daughter Brand pickles & preserves (featured in the “Best Of” issue) will cater the event. Phil Blank, who painted the cover (left), will provide tunes with his rocking klezmer band, Gmish. And the one and only Bernie Herman, whose writing is featured in both issues, will discuss how he came to eat Hog Island sheep barbacoa. What better way to get in the holiday spirit?

New Video from SOHP!

Check out this new video about the three missions of the Southern Oral History Program, featuring Jacquelyn Dowd Hall and a variety of graduate and undergraduate SOHP students.

SOHPbeginning