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Posts from the ‘Research & Scholarship’ Category

Tell About the South: Ted Shaw, Tuesday, September 16 at 12:30 pm

Ted ShawPlease join us at the Love House and Hutchins Forum for a lunchtime discussion with Ted Shaw, Director of UNC’s Center for Civil Rights. Shaw serves as the Julius L. Chambers Distinguished Professor of Law at UNC School of Law, where he teaches Civil Procedure and Advanced Constitutional Law. Before joining the faculty of UNC Law School, Professor Shaw taught at Columbia University Law School from 2008-2014. During that time he was also “Of Counsel” to the law firm of Norton Rose Fulbright (formerly Fulbright & Jaworski, LLP).  His practice involved civil litigation and representation of institutional clients on matters concerning diversity and civil rights.

The title of Professor Shaw’s talk will be “The Work and Mission of the Center for Civil Rights.” Since its founding by Julius L. Chambers (1936-2013) in 2001, the Center has strived to extend America’s promise of justice, prosperity, and opportunity by elevating families and communities above the boundaries of race, class, and place. Its mission is to use community-based impact advocacy and legal education and scholarship to advance strategies that secure social, economic, and environmental justice for low wealth, minority families, and neighborhoods.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.

Hutchins Lecture by David Hurst Thomas, Thursday, September 18 at 4:30 pm

ThomasOur first Hutchins lecture of the 2014-15 academic year, titled “Romance and Reality in the Deep South’s Mythical Mission Past,” will address the nostalgia and romance that has long surrounded the Franciscan and Jesuit missions across America. From San Francisco through the Southwest to the American South, mainstream American history has constructed and perpetuated an idealized, romanticized version of the Spanish mission – complete with Mission Revival architectural styles and reconstructed archaeological sites that sometimes resemble Hollywood stage sets. This illustrated talk draws upon recent archaeological evidence from St. Catherines Island (Georgia) and suggests more historically appropriate perspectives on the mission heritage of the Deep South. The discovery of Mission Santa Catalina de Guale has contributed significantly to knowledge about early inhabitants of the island and about the Spanish presence in Georgia, nearly two centuries before the arrival of British colonists.

St CatherinesDavid Hurst Thomas has served since 1972 as Curator of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History.  He has organized and directed more than 100 archaeological excavations, including the discovery of Gatecliff Shelter in Nevada, the deepest archaeological rockshelter in the Americas. He has also taught at Columbia University, New York University, University of California (Davis), University of Florida, University of Nevada, and the City College of New York. Thomas is the author of over 30 books, including St. Catherines: An Island in Time (University of Georgia Press, 2010) and Skull Wars (Basic Books, 2001).

Hutchins Lecture: Rebecca J. Scott, Tuesday, October 14 at 4:30 pm

rebecca scottIn her Hutchins Lecture, titled “Tracing Atlantic Revolutions: One Family’s Itinerary,” Professor Scott will talk about the research that went into the writing of her recent book (coauthored with Jean M. Hébrard) Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (Harvard UP, 2012; paperback, August 2014), which traces one family’s interaction with law and official documents across five generations.  The story begins in West Africa with the enslavement of a woman named Rosalie, then follows her to the French Caribbean at the time of the Haitian Revolution. Rosalie’s daughter Elisabeth later settled in Louisiana, but in the face of hostility to free persons of color, the family migrated to France. Two of Elisabeth’s sons then returned to Louisiana to become equal-rights activists during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Piecing together this family’s history helps to place Reconstruction in the southern United States into a transnational perspective, with threads continuing into 20th-century Europe.

Rebecca J. Scott is the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. At the Law School, she teaches a course on civil rights and the boundaries of citizenship in historical perspective, as well as a seminar on the law in slavery and freedom. Freedom Papers has been awarded the 2012 Albert Beveridge Book Award in American History and the James Rawley Book Prize in Atlantic History, both from the American Historical Association. The book also has been awarded the 2013 Chinard Prize from the Society for French Historical Studies and the Institut Français d’Amerique. Scott received an AB from Radcliffe College, an MPhil in economic history from the London School of Economics, and a PhD in history from Princeton University. She has held the Guggenheim Fellowship and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

“An Eye for Mullet”: Photographs by Charles A. Farrell / Text by David S. Cecelski

Our Fall 2014 Art @ the Center exhibit, co-sponsored by UNC Press and the Department of American Studies, features photographs from a seasonal mullet fishing camp at Brown’s Island in Onslow County, North Carolina. The photographs were taken in 1938 by Charles A. Farrell, to be published in a book that never quite made it to press. However, they will (finally!) appear in the Fall 2014 issue of Southern Cultures as an annotated photo essay by historian David S. Cecelski, who is working to bring a collection of Farrell’s photos to publication with UNC Press. “Our world today is so different than that of only a century ago,” writes Cecelski, “that few people can recognize even the most basic aspects of daily life and labor as seen in [these] photographs.” Yet the black-and-white images reveal “the changing nature of our relationship to the ocean and seashore.” You can listen to voices and stories from the Southern Oral History Program‘s “Coastal Carolina” series here.

Fish sliderJoin us for the exhibit’s opening reception on Friday, September 12, when we will enjoy sustainable Carolina seafood from Ricky Moore’s Saltbox Seafood Joint as well as live music on the porch by Wayne Martin & Friends. The reception is free and open to the public, but $20 gets you “Fish and an Ish”: a plate of Ricky’s delicious seafood and the special water issue of Southern Cultures. To purchase tickets, click here.

Tell About the South: Kathleen DuVal, Tuesday, September 23 at 12:30 pm

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Kathleen DuVal, Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. DuVal’s talk, titled “Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution,”  focuses on the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. Based on her research for a forthcoming book by the same title, “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences, including incorporation into a rising American republic.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to pathorn@unc.edu.