Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Research & Scholarship’ Category

2014/2015 Hutchins Series Now Streaming

Before our new series of Hutchins Lectures begins in September, catch up on last year’s lectures, streaming now on Vimeo. Matthew Raiford discusses  “Sustainable, Organic, & Slow: Restoring the Legacy of Black Family Farms,” Leslie Bow talks about her book,  ‘Partly Colored': Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, and Waldo E. Martin Jr. addresses “Reaping the Whirlwind”: The Contested History of the Black Panther Party. And that’s just the beginning!

Tell About the South: Evan Faulkenbury, Tues, Oct 27 at 12:30 pm

Evan Faulkenbury photoThe money to pay for the Civil Rights Movement had to come from somewhere. In this talk, Evan Faulkenbury will tell the story of the Voter Education Project (VEP) and how philanthropic foundations paid for and influenced the course of the movement during the 1960s. The VEP solicited grants from foundations, then dispersed the money to hundreds of grassroots voter registration campaigns across the eleven states of the Old Confederacy. With these grants, ranging from $200 to $20,000, local civil rights movements sprang up across the South, coalescing into the broader African American freedom struggle. The VEP was the behind-the-scenes engine of the Civil Rights Movement, empowering local activists to register people, to challenge Jim Crow at the polls, and to revolutionize southern and national politics.

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Faulkenbury, a PhD candidate in History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Field Scholar with the Southern Oral History Program. This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Evan Faulkenbury Image

SOHP Intern Presentation, Wed, April 29 at 1:00 pm

Interns_croppedThe Southern Oral History Program‘s current interns–Liz Kennedy, Holly Plouff, Bryan Smith, and Samantha Gregg– have been hard at work this semester!  Their project mapped the history of desegregation in North Carolina for high school teachers and created a women’s history walking tour of UNC, all through the medium of oral history. Please join us at the Center to enjoy their creative final project-a performance based on interviews with women about women’s activism at UNC and its relationship to the broader feminist movement.  We know you’ll be impressed with their research and their creative use of performance as a method of disseminating their findings to the community.

Tell About the South: Rob Shapard, Tues, April 21 at 12:30 pm

Rob Shapard copyPlease join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Rob Shapard, a doctoral student in U.S. History and 2014-15 McColl Fellow at CSAS. In his talk, Calculating Eye and Rough Hand: Turning Longleaf into Board Feet and Sawdust,” Shapard will describe the perspective of one sawmilling firm, the Louisiana Central Lumber Company, toward the old-growth Louisiana longleaf pine forests that it felled and milled into lumber in the early twentieth century. The language that the company used to describe longleaf and other trees, a kind of “lumber lexicon,” reveals this perspective and helps to explain the company’s effectiveness in making lumber from longleaf. The topic is one aspect of Shapard’s doctoral dissertation on attitudes toward longleaf pine across the American South. Shapard is a native of the erstwhile textile town of Griffin, Georgia, a former journalist, and a student/scholar of environmental history and oral history.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Dr. Mindi Spencer on “Southern Discomfort,” Wed, April 15 at 4:30 pm

southern_discomfort