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Posts from the ‘Research & Scholarship’ Category

Hutchins Lecture: Sam W. Haynes, Wed, Sept 16 at 4:30 pm

Join us in the Pleasants Room at Wilson Library for the first James and Marguerite Hutchins Lecture of 2015-16, as Dr. Sam W. Haynes presents a lecture on “Unbecoming Southern: The Roots of Texas Exceptionalism.”

haynesMany Texas historians have argued that the bitter experience of the Civil War prompted white Texans in later years to downplay their southern roots. In an effort to disassociate the state from the trauma of the Lost Cause, they tailored their historical memory to give greater emphasis to the region’s frontier heritage. In so doing, they laid claim to an artificial brand of exceptionalism, constructing an elaborate and ennobling mythology around the exploits of Anglo-Texans in their conflicts with Mexicans and Native Americans. However, Anglo-Texan men and women sought to craft a new identity for the state in strikingly different ways. This lecture will examine efforts to rebrand Texas in the early twentieth century, emphasizing the gendered dimensions of a process in which women’s organizations, such as the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, and male business leaders offered their own distinct interpretations of the state’s past.

Sam W. Haynes is a professor of History and director of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies at UT-Arlington. Specializing in Jacksonian America, 19th century Texas, and the American Southwest, he is the author of three books, including Unfinished Revolution: Unfinished RevolutionThe Early American Republic in a British World, a study of nineteenth century American attitudes toward Great Britain, and James K. Polk and the Expansionist Impulse. He is the editor of an anthology of essays, Contested Empire: Rethinking the Texas Revolution, which was published last month by Texas A&M University Press. His current book project examines Anglo, Mexican, and Native American conflict in Texas during the early nineteenth century.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Hutchins Lecture by Tracy K’Meyer, Thurs, Oct 22 at 4:30 pm

???????????????????????????????“The promise and failure,” “the rise and retreat,” the “failed social experiment”—these are terms used by scholars and pundits to characterize the lost battle for school desegregation in the South and across the nation.  But, drawing on nearly 100 oral history interviews, Tracy K’Meyer uncovers an alternative story of black and white allies fighting for and defending the integration of the Louisville and Jefferson County public schools as part of a broader struggle for racial equality.  By attending to the way local people remember both what went wrong in desegregation and the resulting damage especially to black students, and also what went right and the benefits to individuals and the community, K’Meyer argues, we can better understand contemporary debates over racial equality and diversity in the schools.

KMeyer cover imageK’Meyer is Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Louisville, where she also serves as Co-Director of the Oral History Center.  Her research focuses on the history of modern U.S. social movements, most recently on the struggles for equality in education and housing.  She is currently working on a book on the American Friends Service Committee. K’Meyer’s lecture, titled “Remembering School Desegregation: Oral History and the Long Struggle for Equality in Education in Louisville, KY, 1954-2015,” will be held in the University Room in Hyde Hall.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Tell About the South: Evan Faulkenbury, Tues, Oct 27 at 12:30 pm

Evan Faulkenbury photoThe money to pay for the Civil Rights Movement had to come from somewhere. In this talk, Evan Faulkenbury will tell the story of the Voter Education Project (VEP) and how philanthropic foundations paid for and influenced the course of the movement during the 1960s. The VEP solicited grants from foundations, then dispersed the money to hundreds of grassroots voter registration campaigns across the eleven states of the Old Confederacy. With these grants, ranging from $200 to $20,000, local civil rights movements sprang up across the South, coalescing into the broader African American freedom struggle. The VEP was the behind-the-scenes engine of the Civil Rights Movement, empowering local activists to register people, to challenge Jim Crow at the polls, and to revolutionize southern and national politics.

Please join us at the Center for a lunchtime discussion with Faulkenbury, a PhD candidate in History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Field Scholar with the Southern Oral History Program. This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

Evan Faulkenbury Image

2014-15 Hutchins Lectures Now Streaming

Before our new series of Hutchins Lectures begins in September, catch up on last year’s lectures, streaming now on Vimeo. Matthew Raiford discusses  “Sustainable, Organic, & Slow: Restoring the Legacy of Black Family Farms,” Leslie Bow talks about her book,  ‘Partly Colored': Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, and Waldo E. Martin Jr. addresses “Reaping the Whirlwind”: The Contested History of the Black Panther Party. And that’s just the beginning!

SOHP Intern Presentation, Wed, April 29 at 1:00 pm

Interns_croppedThe Southern Oral History Program‘s current interns–Liz Kennedy, Holly Plouff, Bryan Smith, and Samantha Gregg– have been hard at work this semester!  Their project mapped the history of desegregation in North Carolina for high school teachers and created a women’s history walking tour of UNC, all through the medium of oral history. Please join us at the Center to enjoy their creative final project-a performance based on interviews with women about women’s activism at UNC and its relationship to the broader feminist movement.  We know you’ll be impressed with their research and their creative use of performance as a method of disseminating their findings to the community.