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Fall 2014 Music on the Porch clips

Enjoy some of our favorite clips from the Fall 2014 Music on the Porch series! We’ll be back on the porch in Spring 2015.

 

 

 

Jim Ketch’s Late Night Composition

Faculty Jazz Ensemble

Straight, No Chaser

Troop & Sanchez, Yulumbraba

Troop & Sanchez, Tango

Troop & Sanchez, On & On

Register now for a free online course with William R. Ferris

A new, free, six-week online course that explores the stories, music and art of the American South will be offered Oct. 13 to Nov. 28, developed and taught by the Center’s Senior Associate Director, William R. Ferris, in conjunction with the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education.


About the Course:

This course explores the stories, music, and art of the American South and considers how they serve as a window on the region’s history and culture. We will see how the region’s distinctive sense of place defines music and literature in each generation. From small farms to urban neighborhoods, from the region itself to more distant worlds of the southern diaspora, stories, music, and art chronicle places and the people who live within them.

Our course explores the nature of oral tradition and how its study can provide a methodology for understanding Southern literature. We will discuss Southern artists and photographers and will show how the history and traditions of the South influences their work. We will consider the work of Southern Writers and discuss how they utilize specific stories, music, and art as a structure for literary forms such as the novel and the short story. Lastly, we look into the rich history of southern music and its roots in work chants, fife and drum, and one-strand on the wall musics.

Sign Up:
For more information, and to register for free, visit: www.coursera.org/course/south.

Southern Cultures Fall Issue: Southern Waters

From mullet fishing on Brown’s Island to shrimping on the Gulf Coast, from recreation on the Great Lakes of the South to coastal tourism in the Sunbelt and tramping in the swampy lowlands of eastern NC, we take a look at tourism’s vital role in regional economies and the challenges of conservation and sustainability.

FREE FROM THE ISSUE!  >>READ HERE>>
“The BP Oil Spill and the End of Empire, Louisiana”
by Andy Horowitz

“‘Hey, I can survive, I’m a survivor. You see that Survivor show on TV? That ain’t nothing.”

KEEP READING:

Also in this issue, Andrew W. Kahrl examines the Sunbelt’s foundation, “plac[ing] the coast at the center of the story and seek[ing] to understand how beaches came to reflect and influence broader changes in the region’s cultures and political economy.” Christopher J. Manganiello details the rise of dams on the Savannah River, which now block the migration of shad and sturgeon. “What did the shoals look like when the lilies bloomed?” he asks. “And…what would it be like to witness the great shad migrations and fishing parties of the past?” Ian Draves addresses that question by exploring the Tennessee Valley Authority’s impact on tourism, and John James Kaiser chronicles the battle over rate hikes and regulated energy from North Carolina’s Southern Power Company (now Duke Energy).

David Cecelski’s annotated photo essay, “An Eye for Mullet,” provides witness to Brown’s Island Mullet Camp. The photos, taken by Charles Farrell in 1938, reflect a time when fish dealers in Morehead City, N.C., “loaded so many barrels of salt mullet on outbound freight cars that local people referred to the railroad as ‘the Old Mullet Line.’” Bernard L. Herman and William Arnett offer another visual take on water through the work of artists including Lonnie Holley, Ronald Lockett, and Thornton Dial Jr.

ALSO! Poetry by Patricia Smith; and a short recollection by Bland Simpson on the swamps of his youth.

Read in printonline through Project MUSE, and in various eBook formats.

Images: “The Old Water,” 2004, Thornton Dial Jr.; Phillip Simmons, Empire, LA, 2010, photo by Andy Horowitz.

 

Deltra Tate named Administrative Manager of CSAS

Deltra2The Center for the Study of the American South proudly announces Deltra Tate as our new Administrative Manager and Events Coordinator. Her appointment began on July 7, 2014. Tate comes to the Center from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, where she served as a staff specialist in the Admissions Department.

“Deltra Tate brings expertise in human resources management and event planning to the Center,” said Kenneth Janken, Interim Director of the Center.  “A native and life-long resident of Durham and a product of North Carolina’s public schools, Deltra has earned both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business administration.  With her varied experiences in higher education and private industry, Deltra is certain to ensure the smooth running of the Center and its programming.”

The William R. Ferris Reader

Available for download now on your favorite eReader via SouthernCultures.org/BF20.

Renowned folklorist William R. Ferris has captured the voices of southern musicians, artists, writers, and thinkers for forty years—and we have been proud to publish his work in Southern Cultures for nearly half of that time.

To celebrate Southern Cultures‘s 20th anniversary, we present our inaugural special omnibus ebook, The William R. Ferris Reader. Collected here for the first time are all 20 of Bill Ferris’s essays and interviews as they have appeared in our pages between 1995 and 2013, as well as an introduction to the collection by Ferris.

From folk humor to moon pies to Faulkner, Welty, Walker, and so much more, we are delighted to share this special collection of a favored friend, mentor, and colleague.

Ferris eReader Contents

Get yours now for KindleiTunes, and Kobo. More formats coming soon!