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Posts from the ‘Live Music’ Category

Justin Robinson & Friends @ Long View Center, Friday, April 25 at 7:30 pm

SOOTS - Songs of the carolina twilight

Sustaining Roots Music (SOOTS) is a community project at Raleigh Charter High School that seeks to preserve the local vernacular culture of the American South, particularly the music of the North Carolina Piedmont. Following the model of the Music Maker Relief Foundation, SOOTS students organize benefit concerts and host guest lectures that connect diverse communities, including local businesses, teenage students, and professional artists, in the common cause of raising awareness and funds for  aging musicians. SOOTS has worked closely with CSAS since 2010.

The 8th Annual SOOTS Benefit on April 25th in Raleigh will feature Justin Robinson with his current band, the Mary Annettes. Robinson was one of the founding members of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, with whom he won a Grammy in 2010 for their album Genuine Negro Jig. Robinson left the group in 2011 to pursue his Master’s in Forestry at NC State University. Robinson also teaches violin and is currently in the studio as a producer for multiple local bands’ projects. Aside from the fiddle, Robinson now plays the autoharp and his new harp from Paraguay, which he played for SOOTS students during an energetic Q&A session earlier this month.

To order tickets: www.seatyourself.biz/sootsblues

For more information on SOOTS: www.sootsblues.org

ConvergeNC Southern Music Festival, April 3-5, 2014

ConvergeNC logoCSAS is pleased to co-sponsor ConvergeNC 2014! Back for a second year, the festival features a variety of musical acts from campus and the local area as well as points north, south, east, and west.

Thursday, April 3rd, Clockwork Kids will play from their new album Rememory with a light show at the Morehead Planetarium. Élève will open. Tickets are $10, including a copy of Rememory. Doors at 7:00, show at 7:38.

Friday, April 4th, Mipso will headline at the Cat’s Cradle, with the Punch Brothers’ Chris Eldridge supporting. Tickets are $12 presale, $15 day of. Doors at 8:00, show at 9:00. Later that night, ConvergeNC will present a North Carolina hip-hop showcase in the Cat’s Cradle Back Room.

Saturday, April 5th, legendary old-time singer Alice Gerrard and Hiss Golden Messenger’s Mike Taylor will discuss authenticity in Southern Music at UNC’s Gerrard Hall. Doors at 12:30, discussion at 1:00. Beginning at 3:30, ConvergeNC 2014 will present the following artists at UNC’s Bell Tower Amphitheater: Floating Action, Rome Fortune, Ryan Gustafson, Dark Water Rising, T0w3rs, Ghostt Bllonde, and Myrna and Claudia Lopez Bascunan.

ConvergeNC 2013

ConvergeNC is sponsored by Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation, UNC Student Congress, the Carolina Union Activities Board, the Orange County Arts Commission, the North Carolina Humanities Council, Mills Rentals, the Center for the Study of the American South, Hickory Tavern, the Center for Global Initiatives, the UNC American Studies and Music Departments, Whole Foods, Carrboro Coffee Roasters, Townsend Bertram, the ArtsCenter, and Steel String Brewery.

ALL SATURDAY EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, WITH FREE PUBLIC PARKING AT THE BELL TOWER PARKING DECK.

View some highlights from last year’s festival here.

Hutchins Lecture by Murphy Hicks Henry, Thursday, April 3 at 4:30 pm

Murphy Hicks HenryPlease join us for Murphy Hicks Henry’s lecture on “Steel-String Magnolias: Women in Bluegrass,” at 4:30 in the Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill. This lecture will focus on women’s historical contributions to the development of bluegrass, which have often been overlooked in favor of male musicians and headliners.

Murphy Hicks Henry is the author of Pretty Good For A Girl: Women in Bluegrass (University of Illinois Press, 2013). She wrote a monthly column titled “On the Road” for Banjo Newsletter for over twenty years before turning it over to her daughter, Casey. She is the cofounder (with her husband, Red) of the Murphy Method, a forty-plus video series offering instruction on the banjo, guitar, mandolin, fiddle, and ukulele. Henry and her husband also perform as “Red and Murphy.” They have recorded six LPs and numerous CDs featuring many of Henry’s original songs, including the feminist number “I Ain’t Domesticated Yet.”

Music on the Porch: Murphy Hicks Henry, Thursday, April 3 at 12:00 pm

MurphyJoin us on the porch for a special noon performance by banjo virtuoso Murphy Hicks Henry and her two sisters, Nancy Pate and Laurie Tanner. Henry and her husband perform as “Red and Murphy,” and Nancy (guitar) and Laurie (bass) played in the band for several years. The band has recorded six LPs and numerous CDs featuring many of Henry’s original songs, including the feminist number “I Ain’t Domesticated Yet.” Nancy is also a songwriter, and the group has recorded several of her original songs. According to Murphy, “We were all raised in North Georgia (Clarkesville), a family of five girls. Our father was the general practitioner there for 50 years, and our mother was a homemaker who turned Southern Baptist Church activist when we all left the nest.” The group will perform a combination of original songs, gospel tunes, and what Henry calls “some bluegrass standards that we have flipped the gender on.”

Murphy Hicks Henry is the cofounder (with her husband Red) of the Murphy Method, a forty-plus video series offering instruction on the banjo, guitar, mandolin, fiddle, and ukulele. She is also the author of Pretty Good For A Girl: Women in Bluegrass (University of Illinois Press, 2013). Murphy wrote a monthly column in the Banjo Newsletter for over twenty years before turning it over to her daughter, Casey.

Music on the Porch: Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba, Thursday, March 27 at 5:30 pm

Diali-Cissokho-Kaira-Ba-lg-2Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba formed after Senegalese griot musician Diali Keba Cissokho moved to North Carolina and began to look for musicians who shared his love and passion for creating music based on Manding tradition, flavored with local and personal styles. The outcome of this collaboration is an infectious sound reminiscent of West African dance bands full of unison melody, adventurous improvisation, fiery solos and polyrhythmic frameworks. With lyrics in Manding, Wolof, and English, Kaira Ba illuminates its listeners with stories of ancient and modern West Africa and how they relate to today’s universal experiences and emotions felt by everyone, regardless of origin. Kaira Ba invokes the participation of the audience in the creation of captivating musical moments that often incite spontaneous dancing by the performers and audiences alike, helping to create a peaceful and loving community. This event is co-sponsored by UNC’s Department of Music, the Center for Global Intiatives, and the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. Read more