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Posts from the ‘Live Music’ Category

Southern Cultures Double Issue Release Party, Thursday, December 4 at 5:30 pm

whale cover

Please join us at the Center as we celebrate the release of two new issues of Southern Cultures! The Winter 2014 issue examines southern politics, dashboard poets, the caning of Charles Sumner, and the “harmless, humorous hick” persona of Gomer Pyle (as well as the actor who came to inhabit that persona). You’ll find photographs by Michael W. Panhorst, poetry by Joseph Bathanti, and important pointers for how to catch and smoke the tastiest eels.

sc best of food draft

 

We’re simultaneously launching our first-ever Best of Food issue, which collects some of our favorite writing on southern food and foodways. Inside you’ll find essays on Native food in the Native South, eating with “molasses-colored glasses,” an early twentieth century “Girls’ Tomato Club,” and more. Order your copy today, or go all out and order the whole tote bag!

April McGreger of Farmer’s Daughter Brand pickles & preserves (featured in the “Best Of” issue) will cater the event. Phil Blank, who painted the cover (left), will provide tunes with his rocking klezmer band, Gmish. And the one and only Bernie Herman, whose writing is featured in both issues, will discuss how he came to eat Hog Island sheep barbacoa. What better way to get in the holiday spirit?

Fall 2014 Music on the Porch clips

Enjoy some of our favorite clips from the Fall 2014 Music on the Porch series! We’ll be back on the porch in Spring 2015.

 

 

 

Jim Ketch’s Late Night Composition

Faculty Jazz Ensemble

Straight, No Chaser

Troop & Sanchez, Yulumbraba

Troop & Sanchez, Tango

Troop & Sanchez, On & On

Music on the Porch: Faculty Jazz Quintet, Thursday, October 23 at 5:30 pm

We’re celebrating the final Music on the Porch performance of the semester with free pizza! Join us at the Love House for an exciting performance by five of UNC’s very own jazz virtuosos. Led by Professor Jim Ketch (trumpet), the quintet also includes Professors Stephen Anderson (piano), Juan Alamo (vibes), Jason Foureman (bass) and Dan Davis (drums). Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Faculty_jazz

The UNC Jazz Studies area serves a growing undergraduate student population through a variety of classroom courses in jazz history, improvisation, harmony, and composition/arranging. A highly successful Summer Jazz Workshop is attracting high school, collegiate, and adult learners from across NC and beyond. Students perform in the UNC Jazz Band, 4-5 Jazz Combos, and Charanga Carolina. Students also have the opportunity to perform with distinguished guest jazz artists. Recent guests have included Kate McGarry, Dave Pietro, Luis Bonilla, Eric Alexander, Rodney Whitaker, Marcus Roberts, Jason Marsalis, Dave Stryker, Joel Frahm, Joe Magnarelli, Gary Smulyan, Scott Wendholt, Steve Wilson, and many others. The UNC Jazz Band and Jazz Combos have recorded 4 compact disks and Charanga Carolina recently released their second recording.

Music on the Porch: Joe Troop & Diego Sánchez, Thursday, October 9 at 5:30 pm

Troop & Sanchez tourWhen self-described “North Carolina-born banjoist, fiddler, singer-songwriter and nomad” Joe Troop graduated from UNC and moved to Buenos Aires, says his bandmate Diego Sánchez, “he ruined everything.” Before that, Sánchez had claimed to be “the only banjo player in Argentina.”

Now the acoustic world-music duo is returning stateside for their first U.S. tour, funded in part by a Kickstarter campaign. Join us on the porch at the Love House for a blend of traditional North Carolina and Latin American music, inspired at Carolina and perfected 5,000 miles away. This event is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!!

Music on the Porch: Lonnie Holley, Wednesday, October 1 at 5:30 pm

Lonnie 1Please join us on the porch to appreciate a multimodal artist who defies all genres and categories. During his week-long visit to UNC-Chapel Hill in late September and early October, Lonnie Holley will visit classes in Art, Folklore, and American Studies, create new sculptures with found and recycled materials, engage in public conversations, and give a musical-spoken word performance, “Thumbs Up For Mother Universe,”at the Center.

Over the last forty years, Holley has created an amazing series of sculptures, assemblages, and multimedia performances. Working primarily with “scrap,” recycled, and found materials, he creates art from the detritus of modern American society. Holley’s aesthetic is centered in rehabilitated beauty: finding art in the ugly places. Although he has recently been featured in the New York Times and the Washington Post, Lonnie’s work has largely lived outside the curated spaces of art museums and critical reviews. He represents what American Studies professor Bernie Herman calls the “Birmingham-Bessemer School”: a cohort of Alabama artists whose work speaks to the deep conflicted histories of the American South and beyond.


Lonnie2

You can hear a sample of Lonnie’s music and see more of his work here.