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Posts from the ‘Featured’ Category

Hutchins Lecture: Robert Gipe, Thurs, March 9 at 4:30 pm

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“Storytellers and Sociopaths: Thoughts on How We Define Reality from Post-Obama Appalachia”

This lecture will explore connections between the rich storytelling tradition, grinding economic challenges, hard political choices, despair, and hope experienced by people in the southeast Kentucky coalfields. Gipe will read from his previously published fiction, and he will address the creation of the Higher Ground community performances, a series of oral history-based theater events in Harlan County, Kentucky which have been running from 2003 to the present.

Gipe_TrampolineRobert Gipe is the author of the award-winning illustrated novel Trampoline (Ohio University Press, 2015). His short story “Dreadful Crash” appeared in the 21C Fiction Issue of Southern Cultures (Fall 2016). Gipe teaches at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, where he directs the Appalachian Studies program. He has worked previously as a pickle packer, a forklift driver, and a DJ.

This lecture, to be held in 039 Graham Memorial Hall, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Panel on the Death Penalty in North Carolina, Thurs, Mar 2 at 4:30 pm

Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum for a discussion of the current state and politics of the death penalty. This program is offered in conjunction with the new Process Series production Count. Directed by Lynden Harris, Count will be performed on Friday, March 3 and Saturday, March 4 at 8:00 pm. More details about the play are available here.

Our panel will feature Professors Frank Baumgartner and Isaac Unah (UNC Political Science); Jennifer Thompson (author of Picking Cotton and President of Healing Justice); and Lynden Harris (Hidden Voices). This event is free and open to the public.

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Co-sponsored: Race and Waste in an Aluminum Town

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This oral history-based performance examines the history of a North Carolina aluminum town–or, really, two towns: Badin and West Badin. In addition to the personal losses experienced by the residents of these towns, the play reveals how discriminatory practices of pollution and toxic waste disposal produced disparate health outcomes for the residents of these primarily white and primarily black southern towns. We salute the courageous and compelling work of our 2016-17 McColl Fellow, Pavithra Vasudevan, as well as the community participants who had the courage to share their stories. Shows on Friday at 8:00 pm, Saturday at 8:00 pm, and Sunday at 2:00 pm.

Monique Truong on Food, Literature, and Immigration, Fri, Oct 28 at 12:00 pm

truongJoin us in the Hitchcock Room at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center as we welcome Monique Truong back to the Old North State. Her lecture is titled “Writing Plenty / Writing Hunger / Writing North Carolina.” The talk will begin with Truong’s first meal in the U.S., eaten in a refugee relocation camp in 1975, and will explore the “magical thinking” relationship that she formed toward food during her girlhood in Boiling Springs, NC.

Born in Saigon, South Vietnam in 1968, Monique Truong is a novelist and essayist based in Brooklyn. She is the author of the national bestseller The Book of Salt (2003) and Bitter in the Mouth (2010). Her novel The Sweetest Fruits is forthcoming from Viking Books. Translated into 14 languages, her novels have garnered her a Guggenheim Fellowship, the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, and the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, among other honors. She is currently the Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College, CUNY. A graduate of Yale University and Columbia University School of Law, Truong is also an intellectual property attorney.

She is also a contributor to the forthcoming 21C Fiction Issue of Southern Cultures, which you can preview here.

bitterinthemouthThis lecture is co-sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, the Department of English and Comparative Literature, the Carolina Asia Center, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Institute for Arts and Humanities, the Food For All campus theme, and Southern Cultures, as well as UNC Libraries’ North Carolina Collection and Southern Historical Collection.

Music on the Porch: The Old Ceremony, Thurs, Sept 29 at 5:30pm

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Since they formed in 2004, The Old Ceremony have built a unique body of recordings that evoke distinctive musical and lyrical sensibilities, while tapping into a rich, unmistakably Southern vein of melodic songcraft and vivid storytelling. The band appeared at Atlanta’s Summer Shade Festival in August, and they performed with The Connells at Raleigh’s Little Theater on September 17.

Taking their name from Leonard Cohen’s classic album, The Old Ceremony are singer/songwriter Django Haskins, drummer Dan Hall, vibes/organist Mark Simonsen, bassist Shane Hartman, and violinist Gabriel PelliTheir last album, Sprinter, was released in 2012 by Yep Roc Records, and you can hear them on ReverbNation and YouTube.

This event is free and open to the public, and it will happen RAIN OR SHINE! Wear galoshes and stay for a while!