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In Memoriam: Marguerite P. Hutchins (1920-2016)

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Friends and family of Marguerite Pegram Hutchins gathered in Chapel Hill on June 1, 2016 to mourn her passing and to remember a life lived to the fullest. Together with her late husband James, Marguerite traveled (for business or pleasure) to every country in the world. An archive of previous James and Marguerite Hutchins Lectures (with downloadable videos) is available here, and our 2016-17 lecture series will be posted in the fall.

In a 2015 interview for the Southern Oral History Program, Mrs. Hutchins recalled that as a child in Winston-Salem, “You were taught to be honest, and work hard, and appreciate others, and help the community.” Her life put those principles to work, and she still managed to have fun almost everywhere she went. Comments from Marguerite’s 95th birthday party are available here, and a full obituary is available here.

Southern Cultures presents Documentary Arts & 21st Century Fiction

Up next from Southern Cultures: a special (Fall 2016) issue focusing on 21st Century Fiction — including six new works of creative short fiction, critical essays on contemporary southern literature, and a who’s who roundtable feature we’re calling “Twenty, Twenty-One.” Subscribe now and reserve your copy!

Two SOHP Final Presentations

We were pleased to host two final presentations at the Love House & Hutchins Forum by graduate and undergraduate students who have conducted oral history interviews and fieldwork/research this semester with the Southern Oral History Program.

SOHP internsOn April 28th at 10:00 am, the SOHP undergraduate interns staged a performance based on their interviews with the Black Pioneers, the first group of students to desegregate UNC-Chapel Hill. The performance used the words of these interviewees to showcase the intersection of gender and race in their experiences at UNC and beyond.

SONY DSCRachel Seidman’s students have been investigating stories about Race, Gender, and Entrepreneurship, exploring training and education, motivations for entrepreneurship, attitudes toward debt and credit, the role of families, and connections to wider communities and social movements. They presented their findings on Thursday, May 5th at 4:00 pm.

Music on the Porch: Faculty Jazz Quintet, Thurs, April 21 at 5:30 pm

Join us at the Center for another performance by five stars from UNC’s outstanding jazz program. The quintet will perform “Songs We Know” from the Great American Songbook. UNC’s Faculty Jazz Quintet features Stephen Anderson on piano, Scott Sawyer on guitar, Juan Álamo on vibes, Jason Foureman on bass, and Dan Davis on the drums.

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The UNC Jazz Studies program serves a growing undergraduate student population through a variety of courses in jazz history, improvisation, harmony, and composition/arranging. In addition to these classes, the program’s Summer Jazz Workshop continues to draw high school, collegiate, and adult learners from across North Carolina and beyond. Listen to tracks from Stephen Anderson’s 360 Jazz Initiative or watch a clip from last year’s Music on the Porch performance here.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Music on the Porch: Kidznotes, Thurs, April 14 at 5:30 pm

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Kidznotes is a Triangle-based non-profit organization that seeks to use music as a catalyst for social change, offering free instruction in classical music to students from low-income communities. Studies show that music training is positively associated with more complex brain development, higher school achievement, and other social, economic, and emotional advantages. Research also suggests that the earlier the introduction to music, the greater the benefit. Kidznotes serves children in the years most crucial to their brain and behavioral development, aspiring to “change the life trajectory of underserved K-12 students through orchestral training.”

CSAS is proud to host the Kidznotes Ambassadors All-Star Quartet (7th grade) and the Vivaldi-Copland Band (3rd-7th grade). The ensembles will play a variety of classical and popular pieces inspired by this year’s theme, “Dream Big.” This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!