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Posts from the ‘Featured’ Category

Monique Truong on Food, Literature, and Immigration, Fri, Oct 28 at 12:00 pm

truongJoin us in the Hitchcock Room at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center as we welcome Monique Truong back to the Old North State. Her lecture is titled “Writing Plenty / Writing Hunger / Writing North Carolina.” The talk will begin with Truong’s first meal in the U.S., eaten in a refugee relocation camp in 1975, and will explore the “magical thinking” relationship that she formed toward food during her girlhood in Boiling Springs, NC.

Born in Saigon, South Vietnam in 1968, Monique Truong is a novelist and essayist based in Brooklyn. She is the author of the national bestseller The Book of Salt (2003) and Bitter in the Mouth (2010). Her novel The Sweetest Fruits is forthcoming from Viking Books. Translated into 14 languages, her novels have garnered her a Guggenheim Fellowship, the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, and the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, among other honors. She is currently the Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College, CUNY. A graduate of Yale University and Columbia University School of Law, Truong is also an intellectual property attorney.

She is also a contributor to the forthcoming 21C Fiction Issue of Southern Cultures, which you can preview here.

bitterinthemouthThis lecture is co-sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, the Department of English and Comparative Literature, the Carolina Asia Center, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Institute for Arts and Humanities, the Food For All campus theme, and Southern Cultures, as well as UNC Libraries’ North Carolina Collection and Southern Historical Collection.

Music on the Porch: The Old Ceremony, Thurs, Sept 29 at 5:30pm

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Since they formed in 2004, The Old Ceremony have built a unique body of recordings that evoke distinctive musical and lyrical sensibilities, while tapping into a rich, unmistakably Southern vein of melodic songcraft and vivid storytelling. The band appeared at Atlanta’s Summer Shade Festival in August, and they performed with The Connells at Raleigh’s Little Theater on September 17.

Taking their name from Leonard Cohen’s classic album, The Old Ceremony are singer/songwriter Django Haskins, drummer Dan Hall, vibes/organist Mark Simonsen, bassist Shane Hartman, and violinist Gabriel PelliTheir last album, Sprinter, was released in 2012 by Yep Roc Records, and you can hear them on ReverbNation and YouTube.

This event is free and open to the public, and it will happen RAIN OR SHINE! Wear galoshes and stay for a while! 

Songs from the Musical: Occasional Shivers, Fri, Sept 23 at 8:00 pm

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SRC Poster Session, Fri, Sept 23 at 3:00 pm

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Join us for a public poster session, as our 2016 grant and fellowship recipients present their summer (and ongoing) research with the Southern Research Circle (SRC). Successful applicants were awarded from UNC-Chapel Hill’s departments of Geography, Anthropology, Music, English & Comparative Literature, City & Regional Planning, and American Studies.

These students examined competing models of municipal recovery after major storms, engaged in archeological digs, performed with Afro-Cuban jazz musicians, and interviewed survivors of environmental disasters, to mention just a few of their impressive projects. Stop by to see the exciting new directions these young scholars are moving in their respective fields of study.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Art Reception: The South in Color, Friday, Sept 16 at 5:30

Our Fall 2016 art exhibit features photographs from William Ferris’s latest book, The South in Color. Together with his two previous books, Give My Poor Heart Ease and The Storied South, The South in Color completes Ferris’s documentary trilogy on the South’s tumultuous twentieth century. Although color film was not commonly used by documentarians during the latter half of the twentieth century, Ferris found color to work in significant ways in the photographic journals he created of his world in all its permutations and surprises.

FerrisFerris writes, “These portraits are not of the region’s celebrities–such as Eudora Welty and B.B. King–whom I photographed and wrote about elsewhere. They are, rather, prison inmates, quilt makers, and roadside vendors, photographed as they went about their daily lives. Each person has a deep connection to the place in which she or he lives, and they share intimate ties to family and friends in those places.”

The reception will include light refreshments and a live performance by acclaimed jazz vocalist Yolanda Hall. This event, which is co-sponsored by UNC Press, is free and open to the public.

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