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Posts from the ‘Events’ Category

Miss Nancy Minds Their Manners, Thurs, May 26 at 6:30 pm

The Southern Culture Movie Series, sponsored by the UNC Writing Center, continues on May 26th with a screening of the 2010 documentary Miss Nancy Minds Their Manners.

Miss Nancy

Here’s how the film’s website describes it: “[This] earnest and heartfelt documentary film… follows 79-year-old “Miss Nancy” Rascoe through the engaging task of teaching manners to children in her 200-year-old home in rural Hertford, NC. It’s a five-day and four-night summer etiquette camp like no other and the mix of activities are all rich with Miss Nancy’s true Southern gentility and grace from an era gone by.” 

Disclaimer: No etiquette tests will be given during or after this film screening. This event, which will be held in 116 Murphey Hall, is free and open to the public.

Two SOHP Final Presentations

We were pleased to host two final presentations at the Love House & Hutchins Forum by graduate and undergraduate students who have conducted oral history interviews and fieldwork/research this semester with the Southern Oral History Program.

SOHP internsOn April 28th at 10:00 am, the SOHP undergraduate interns staged a performance based on their interviews with the Black Pioneers, the first group of students to desegregate UNC-Chapel Hill. The performance used the words of these interviewees to showcase the intersection of gender and race in their experiences at UNC and beyond.

SONY DSCRachel Seidman’s students have been investigating stories about Race, Gender, and Entrepreneurship, exploring training and education, motivations for entrepreneurship, attitudes toward debt and credit, the role of families, and connections to wider communities and social movements. They presented their findings on Thursday, May 5th at 4:00 pm.

Music on the Porch: Faculty Jazz Quintet, Thurs, April 21 at 5:30 pm

Join us at the Center for another performance by five stars from UNC’s outstanding jazz program. The quintet will perform “Songs We Know” from the Great American Songbook. UNC’s Faculty Jazz Quintet features Stephen Anderson on piano, Scott Sawyer on guitar, Juan Álamo on vibes, Jason Foureman on bass, and Dan Davis on the drums.

Faculty-jazz

The UNC Jazz Studies program serves a growing undergraduate student population through a variety of courses in jazz history, improvisation, harmony, and composition/arranging. In addition to these classes, the program’s Summer Jazz Workshop continues to draw high school, collegiate, and adult learners from across North Carolina and beyond. Listen to tracks from Stephen Anderson’s 360 Jazz Initiative or watch a clip from last year’s Music on the Porch performance here.

This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Music on the Porch: Kidznotes, Thurs, April 14 at 5:30 pm

Kidznotes1

Kidznotes is a Triangle-based non-profit organization that seeks to use music as a catalyst for social change, offering free instruction in classical music to students from low-income communities. Studies show that music training is positively associated with more complex brain development, higher school achievement, and other social, economic, and emotional advantages. Research also suggests that the earlier the introduction to music, the greater the benefit. Kidznotes serves children in the years most crucial to their brain and behavioral development, aspiring to “change the life trajectory of underserved K-12 students through orchestral training.”

CSAS is proud to host the Kidznotes Ambassadors All-Star Quartet (7th grade) and the Vivaldi-Copland Band (3rd-7th grade). The ensembles will play a variety of classical and popular pieces inspired by this year’s theme, “Dream Big.” This show is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket and stay for a while!

Hutchins Lecture: David Garcia, Tues, April 12 at 4:30 pm

“Music of Latin@s and their Predecessors in the United States before 1900”

What was “Latin music” like in pre-twentieth century America? Was there a “Latin music” or even a Latino identity during this historical period? With the current heated political debates surrounding Latinos, immigration, and national identity, a critical exploration of possible answers to these questions is not merely timely but in fact overdue. This lecture will explore ways of understanding the music of Spanish-speaking communities in pre-twentieth century America and will explain why this history should inform our understanding of Latin@s and their place in American society today.

Garcia-1David Garcia is Associate Professor of Music at UNC-Chapel Hill. He studied music at California State University, Long Beach (B.M. in composition, 1995), UC-Santa Barbara (M.A. in ethnomusicology, 1997), and The City University of New York (Ph.D. in ethnomusicology, 2003). Published in MUSICultures, Journal of the Society for American Music, The Musical Quarterly, and other academic journals, Garcia’s research focuses on the music of the Americas with an emphasis on black music and Latin music of the United States. He is also musical director of UNC’s Charanga Carolina ensemble, which specializes in Cuban danzón and salsa music. Garcia’s current book project, The Logic of Black Music’s African Origins in the Mid-Twentieth Century, is under contract with Duke University Press.