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Posts from the ‘Events’ Category

Rocket Launch: Tues, Sept 19 at 5:30 pm

Join us at the Love House & Hutchins Forum as we celebrate the publication of Gabrielle Calvocoressi‘s new book of poetry, Rocket Fantastic. Calvocoressi teaches creative writing at UNC-Chapel Hill, and she recently assumed duties as poetry editor for Southern Cultures. We’ll also hear some poetry by Tyree Daye, longtime editor of Raleigh Review and author of What You and The Devil Do to Stay Warm (2015).

While she was working on the manuscript, Calvocoressi shared some insights with the Boston Review: “There are three ‘speakers’ in the manuscript: a young man who is deployed in a jungle war in the late 1960s, his sister who is living in the Hollywood Hills, and the bandleader with whom she has become involved (whose band is called Rocket Fantastic). I’m not sure how it will turn all out but there’s something in the variation of voices and the way pieces manage to live in a kind of mystery that resists clear narrative while still telling a story that feels intimate and deeply challenging for me as a writer. And that’s all I want from my work: to push me to a place where failure is always possible and sometimes really wonderful things occur that transform me.”

You can read excerpts from the book here, and you can buy it now from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or your favorite local bookstore. Extra credit for anyone who finishes the book before the party!

Southern Research Circle Poster Session, Mon, Sept 18, 3-5 pm

What do blended musical genres and black architecture have in common with poetry slams? How did Creoles of color campaign for school desegregation in postbellum New Orleans?

Join us for a friendly, informal poster session as we learn about recent graduate and undergraduate research funded by CSAS grants and fellowships. Award recipients completed innovative projects in the fields of History, Anthropology, Music, Environment & Ecology, and American Studies. Come hear about their projects and ask how the Center can help you and your students with your own!

This event is free and open to the public. Tasty morsels will be provided.

Art Reception: Native Veteran Story Quilts, Fri, Sept 15 at 6:00 pm

Join us at the Center as we launch our Fall 2017 art exhibit, featuring story quilts based on the deployed experiences of Native American military veterans. Inspired by oral history interviews with veterans from each of North Carolina’s eight state- and federally-recognized tribes, these quilts are artifacts of lived experience and material culture from the American South. Their stories from World War II through ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan reflect the strength and complications of patriotism, as well as the struggles that sometimes continue after leaving the combat zone.

In addition to comments by Project Director Karen Harley, a member of the Haliwa-Saponi Indian tribe, the opening reception will include performances by Native musicians and excerpts from oral history interviews. This exhibit is made possible with funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The reception is co-sponsored by UNC’s American Indian Center and Department of American Studies.

Bill & Marcie at App State! Fri, Sept 15

On Display Through December 2017

Drop by the Center and check out our Fall 2017 art exhibit, featuring story quilts based on the deployed experiences of Native American military veterans. Inspired by oral history interviews with veterans from each of North Carolina’s eight state- and federally-recognized tribes, these quilts are artifacts of lived experience and material culture from the American South. Their stories from World War II through ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan reflect the strength and complications of patriotism, as well as the struggles that sometimes continue after leaving the combat zone.

This project was conceived and directed by Karen Harley, a member of the Haliwa-Saponi Indian tribe. The exhibit is made possible with funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.