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Posts from the ‘Chandler Lectures’ Category

Making America: Immigration & Entrepreneurship in North Carolina, Tues, March 27 at 7:00 pm

Our 2018 Chandler Conversation in Southern Business History features four leading entrepreneurs who hail from around the world but now call North Carolina home. Please join us in the FedEx Global Education Center for this free panel discussion. Parking is free after 5:00 pm in the McCauley parking deck, directly below the FedEx Center.

Utibe Udoh is the owner of African Land, a retail establishment in Durham that specializes in African clothing, jewelry, sculptures, paintings, and other cultural products. Founded in 1989, the store is a “tribute to Motherland, Africa,” promoting African culture and heritage in North Carolina. Born in Lagos State, Nigeria, Udoh moved to Durham in 1981 to attend college. He received his B.A. in accounting from North Carolina Central University and an MBA from Campbell University.

Uli Bennewitz was born in Lima, Peru, raised in a small Bavarian village in Germany, and educated in Devon, England. He first came to the U.S. in 1980, and his first job was to clear 9,000 acres of farmland in eastern North Carolina. Hoping to build a healthier local food system without chemicals and factory food processing, Bennewitz built the Weeping Radish in Grandy, which has since grown into a 24-acre farm, brewery, butchery / charcuterie, and restaurant complex. He has been credited with inspiring the “brewpub bill” that enabled the microbrewing industry to boom in North Carolina.

Perla Saitz is the Program Director and Co-Owner (with Rebeca Cabrera) of the CHICLE Language Institute in Chapel Hill. The institute offers classes in language and literature for children and adults, as well as translation and interpreting services in Spanish, French, Italian, German, Mandarin Chinese, Arabic, Japanese, Portuguese, Karen, Burmese, Kinyarwanda, and Swahili. Saitz was born in Mexico City, but she has lived in the Chapel Hill/Carrboro area since 1999. Cabrera is from Costa Rica, and she moved to North Carolina in 2009.

Amit Singh co-founded Spectraforce Technologies in 2004. Spectraforce is a global IT consulting, workforce solutions and IT outsourcing services firm with corporate headquarters in Raleigh and 11 offices/development centers across the U.S., India, and Jamaica. Amit moved from India to the United States in 1997 and completed the Executive MBA program at Kenan-Flagler Business School in 2003. Today, Spectraforce provides a portfolio of consulting, staffing, and outsourcing services and solutions to a broad range of clients and industries worldwide.

This panel discussion will be moderated by LaChaun Banks. Banks is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, where she studied global economics, trade, and development. She also attended the Chinese University of Hong Kong and earned an Executive MBA from Kenan-Flagler Business School. As Associate Director for NCGrowth, Banks leads programs in economic development and manages teams that support local start-ups and businesses in rural areas. She specializes in creating jobs and equitable opportunities for people across the state.

Special thanks to our co-sponsors: the Center for Global Initiatives, the Carolina Asia Center, the Department of Asian Studies, the Latina/o Studies Program at UNC-CH, the Carolina Hispanic Association, the Center for European Studies, the Institute for the Study of the Americas, NCGrowth, and the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise.

Chandler Lecture: Trevon D. Logan & Caitlin Rosenthal, Mon, March 6 at 4:30 pm

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According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, economic historians have produced a number of new studies that “reshape how [we] view the connection between slavery and capitalism… show[ing] the role that coercion played in bringing about a modern market system that is more typically identified with freedom.” Was the economic rise of the West dependent upon slavery, or has the economic impact of cotton production been overstated? Have historians of cotton’s “empire” been playing fast and loose with the facts? Or have the economists become “champion nitpickers,” to quote Eric Foner, reducing history to “a source of numbers, a source of data to throw into their equations”?

This year’s Chandler Lecture in Southern Business History will be delivered by Trevon D. Logan and Caitlin Rosenthal. Logan, the Chair of Economics at Ohio State University, has published influential articles in economics, economic history, and sociology journals, as well as a forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press. Rosenthal, Assistant Professor of History at the University of California Berkeley, is the author of From Slavery to Scientific Management (forthcoming from Harvard University Press).

This lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the Davis Research Hub, on the second floor of Davis Library. Light refreshments will be served.

Chandler Lecture by Bryant Simon, Tues, April 5 at 4:30 pm

“The Hamlet Fire: Business, Politics, and Eating in the Age of Reagan”

In September 1991, the Imperial Food Products plant in Hamlet, North Carolina exploded in flames.  Twenty-five people lost their lives in the blaze; most were trapped inside the factory behind locked doors. In this lecture, historian Bryant Simon will explore the deep political, social, and economic causes of the fire: causes that made Imperial workers and their community acutely vulnerable and made the accident that happened there, or one like it, a near inevitability.

SimonBryant Simon is Professor of History at Temple University. He is the author of Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America (Oxford University Press, 2004) and Everything But the Coffee: Learning About America from Starbucks (University of California Press, 2009). His research and scholarship has earned awards and honors from the Fulbright Commission, Humboldt Foundation, Urban History Association, Organization of American Historians, and the Smithsonian Institution. His work has been featured in the New Yorker, Washington Post, and The New Republic.

Video now available on Vimeo!

In September 1991, the Imperial Food Products plant in Hamlet, North Carolina exploded in flames.  Twenty-five people lost their lives in the blaze; most were trapped inside the factory behind locked doors. In this lecture, historian Bryant Simon will explore the deep political, social, and economic causes of the fire: causes that made Imperial workers and their community acutely vulnerable and made the accident that happened there, or one like it, a near inevitability.

SimonBryant Simon is Professor of History at Temple University. He is the author of Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America (Oxford University Press, 2004) and Everything But the Coffee: Learning About America from Starbucks (University of California Press, 2009). His research and scholarship has earned awards and honors from the Fulbright Commission, Humboldt Foundation, Urban History Association, Organization of American Historians, and the Smithsonian Institution. His work has been featured in the New Yorker, Washington Post, and The New Republic.

Global South: State of the Plate, March 27-28, 2015


This year’s Global South Conference will focus on “The Local/Global Nexus” of Southern foodways. Please join us at the FedEx Global Education Center March 27-28! A full schedule is available here.

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The conference will culminate in this year’s Chandler Lecture in Southern Business, presented by Vivian Howard, Ben Knight, Cynthia Hill, and Malinda Maynor Lowery.

Filmmaker_HillIn addition to owning and operating their Kinston, NC restaurant Chef & The Farmer, Howard and Knight star in the acclaimed PBS series “A Chef’s Life.” Hill is Producer/Director and Lowery is Co-Producer of the series. Hill is also an award-winning documentary filmmaker, and Lowery directs the Southern Oral History Program.

This event is free and open to the public. Parking information for the FedEx Center is available here.