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Posts from the ‘Art @ the Center’ Category

Art @ the Center: The Legacy of Hickory Nut Gap Farm

This summer, the Center is proud to feature “Useful Work,” a remarkable collection of photographs from Sherrill’s Inn and Hickory Nut Gap Farm by photographer Ken Abbott. Located in Fairview, North Carolina, the farm and inn were purchased in 1916 by Jim and Elizabeth McClure, a newlywed couple down from Illinois on their honeymoon. Jim and Elizabeth helped found the Farmers Federation, a cooperative organization to bring better agriculture to western North Carolina. Since then, the farm has been managed and worked by five generations of the family (which now includes Agers, Hamiltons, Clarkes, and others), producing grassfed beef, pastured pork and poultry, and organic apples, blackberries, raspberries, and asparagus. Family members also run an art, drama, and horseback riding camp during the summer, as well as Flying Cloud Farm, a nearby organic fruit, flower, and vegetable farm.

HNG portfolio_Abbott (1 of 3)We celebrated Hickory Nut Gap Farm and the farm families with an artist’s reception on Friday, May 30th, but you can still drop by the Center to view the photographs and to hear oral histories from SOHP‘s “Mountain Voices” collection. You can listen to audio clips from interviews of North Carolina farmers and community organizers here.

This exhibit was made possible by a generous gift from Tom Kenan, a dear friend of the Clarke family who spent many memorable days and nights at Hickory Nut Gap Farm.

Art @ the Center: The Legacy of Hickory Nut Gap Farm

This summer, the Center is proud to feature “Useful Work,” a remarkable collection of photographs from Sherrill’s Inn and Hickory Nut Gap Farm by photographer Ken Abbott. Located in Fairview, North Carolina, the farm and inn were purchased in 1916 by Jim and Elizabeth McClure, a newlywed couple down from Illinois on their honeymoon. Jim and Elizabeth helped found the Farmers Federation, a cooperative organization to bring better agriculture to western North Carolina. Since then, the farm has been managed and worked by five generations of the family (which now includes Agers, Hamiltons, Clarkes, and others), producing grassfed beef, pastured pork and poultry, and organic apples, blackberries, raspberries, and asparagus. Family members also run an art, drama, and horseback riding camp during the summer, as well as Flying Cloud Farm, a nearby organic fruit, flower, and vegetable farm.

We celebrated Hickory Nut Gap Farm and the farm families with an artist’s reception on Friday, May 30th at 5:30 pm, but you can still drop by the Center to view the photographs and to hear oral histories from SOHP‘s “Mountain Voices” collection. You can also listen to audio clips from interviews of North Carolina farmers and community organizers here.

This exhibit was made possible by a generous gift from Tom Kenan, a dear friend of the Clarke family who spent many memorable days and nights at Hickory Nut Gap Farm.

Art @ the Center: From Haiti to Mount Olive

This spring, CSAS is pleased to feature a collection of paintings by Michel Obin and Faustin Dumé. The exhibit, “From Haiti to Mt. Olive,” is free and open to the public. An artists’ reception will be held at the Love House & Hutchins Forum on Wednesday, March 5 at 5:30 pm. This event is co-sponsored by UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives, Institute for the Study of the Americas, Department of American Studies, Department of Anthropology, and Art Department, as well as Duke University’s Forum for Scholars and Publics.

Obin homeMichel Obin hails from Cap Haïtien, Haiti, the second largest city after Port-au-Prince. During his youth, Obin travelled extensively in northern Haiti, and he remembers fondly the markets, weddings, religious ceremonies, and national celebrations from the rural and mountainous side of the island. Today, he lives in Mount Olive, North Carolina, where he paints scenes that are alive in his memory and historical events that greatly impacted the American continent.

Obin began painting at an early age, following in the footsteps of his grandfather Sénèque Obin, and his great uncle Philomé Obin, two of the greatest Haitian painters of the twentieth century. Like them, Obin paints scenes that depict the private and public lives of Haitian revolutionary figures. Intimate scenes such as the last moments that Louverture spent with his family blend with major geopolitical events such as Louverture’s capture by the French, which occurred a few hours after his final family reunion.

Obin has both a rich historical imagination and a remarkable ability to render the details of rural life in Haiti, a country he left 27 years ago to pursue his career as an artist in Florida. Now living in Mount Olive, Obin states, “the trees, the flowers, the calm, and the architecture of this little town remind me of old Haitian cities and, at the same time, of the countryside I used to stride across in my youth.” Most of the works displayed here were painted in Mount Olive, where Obin has lived since 2011.

Faust1Faustin Dumé is a Haitian artist who resides in Mount Olive, North Carolina. Dumé left Les Cayes, a city on the southern coast of Haiti, in 2002. With his wife, Dumé first settled in Florida before moving to Mount Olive in 2010. He found work in a local factory and paints at night, after work, or on Sundays.

Dumé began painting in 1996 and has never received formal training. He has an acute sense of movement and an eye for subtle tones and contrasts. The Vodou ceremonies, the dances occurring during celebrations of Lwas (Vodou Gods), and the ritual activities depicted in his paintings are enlivened by Dumé’s capacity of reproducing the visible and invisible motions of crucial elements of Haitian popular beliefs.

Dumé and his wife belong to the Seventh-day Adventist Church and do not practice Vodou themselves. Dumé states, “I do not believe in Vodou, but I know a lot about it. It was all around me when I grew up in Haiti—it’s a part of our national culture. Anyway, when I sit down to paint, only Vodou scenes come to my mind.” Like Michel Obin, Dumé bases his work on memories of Haiti recalled from Mount Olive, a city that harbors and inspires two exceptional visual artists who revisit and reinvent the past and present of Haiti.

See more of the artists’ work via the links below:

Michel Obin
Faustin Dumé

Tuesday, September 3, 2013: The Storied South Art Exhibition and Book Signing at the Center

Coinciding with the book’s publication by UNC Press, the Center is proud to host an opening reception for a new art exhibition featuring the photographs from The Storied South: Voices and Writers of Artists, the newest work from our Senior Associate Director, William R. Ferris.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013, 5:30pm-7:30pm at The Love House & Hutchins Forum.

This event is free and open to the public.

For more details on this event, please go here.

The Storied South: Exhibition and Reading

Coinciding with the book’s publication by UNC Press, the Center is proud to sponsor two events for The Storied South: Voices and Writers of Artists, the newest work from Senior Associate Director William R. Ferris.

 

Art @ the Center — September 3, 2013 (opening reception)

A photography exhibition featuring 45 portraits from The Storied South
5:30 p.m., The Center for the Study of the American South (410 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill)
*Ferris will sign copies of his book (available for purchase) at the opening reception

Book talk and signing — September 5, 2013

5:30 p.m., Pleasants Family Assembly Room, Wilson Library
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
*Co-sponsored by The Center for the Study of the American South, the Southern Folklife Collection, and Friends of the Library

__________________________________________________________________________

Storied South

UNC Press, 2013

About The Storied South

The Storied South features the voices–by turn searching and honest, coy and scathing–of twenty-six of the most luminous artists and thinkers in the American cultural firmament, from Eudora Welty, Pete Seeger, and Alice Walker to William Eggleston, Bobby Rush, and C. Vann Woodward. Masterfully drawn from one-on-one interviews conducted by renowned folklorist William Ferris over the past forty years, the book reveals how storytelling is viscerally tied to southern identity and how the work of these southern or southern-inspired creators has shaped the way Americans think and talk about the South.

 

William Ferris is Joel R. Williamson Eminent Professor of History and senior associate director of the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Ferris is author of Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues, among other books, and coeditor of the award-winning Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.