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Posts from the ‘Art @ the Center’ Category

Sacred Spaces Art Reception, Thurs, Feb 5 at 5:30 pm

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please join us at the Center as we unveil our Spring 2015 art exhibit, “Sacred Spaces: A Look Inside the Home of Harlem Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer.”

These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. In addition to a performance by local musicians from the Durham Symphony Orchestra, the reception will include remarks by Professor Greene, photographer John M. Hall, and Spencer’s granddaughter, Shaun Spencer-Hester, who currently serves as curator for the Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum. North Carolina poet Jeffery Beam will read a small selection from Spencer’s work. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This event, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibit

ASpencerLynchburg2013_53Please stop by the Center and check out our Spring 2015 art exhibit. These photographs by John M. Hall reveal the beautiful and unique home and garden of Anne Spencer in Lynchburg, Virginia. The house, which is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark, served as a salon and southern outpost of the Harlem Renaissance, as the Spencers hosted literary luminaries such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and many others. Spencer also served as the first librarian at the all-black Dunbar High School from 1923-1945. During this period, she helped establish the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, led a campaign to hire black teachers, and served on committees to improve the legal, social, and economic aspects of African Americans’ lives.

OK_ASpencer.gdn2014_9

Anne Spencer’s biographer, Professor Emeritus J. Lee Greene, noted that while moving through her home, Spencer would often “recall a person, an incident, a memory, an object that… made the room seem sacred to her.” This exhibit celebrates the rich legacy of Anne Spencer, including her poetry, her activism, her family, and her home. You can listen to oral histories related to the Harlem Renaissance, African American poetry and activism, and many other related subjects here.

This exhibit, which is co-sponsored by the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is free and open to the public.

Fish and an Ish! Friday Fish Fry & Photo Exhibit, September 12 at 5:30 pm

Please join us at the Love House and Hutchins Forum for the opening reception of our fall art exhibit, “An Eye For Mullet,” co-sponsored by UNC Press and the Department of American Studies. These photographs, taken in a North Carolina mullet camp by Charles A. Farrell in 1938, were collected and curated by historian David S. Cecelski for an annotated photo essay that appears in the forthcoming issue of Southern Cultures. “Our world today is so different than that of only a century ago,” writes Cecelski, “that few people can recognize even the most basic aspects of daily life and labor as seen in [these] photographs.” Yet the black-and-white images reveal “the changing nature of our relationship to the ocean and seashore.” You can listen to voices and stories from the Southern Oral History Program‘s “Coastal Carolina” series here.

Saltbox logoTo celebrate the issue’s release, we have invited Ricky Moore of Durham’s Saltbox Seafood Joint to serve up some of his signature sustainable seafood from the Carolina coast. We’ll also enjoy live music on the porch by Wayne Martin & Friends. The reception is free and open to the public, and $20 gets you “Fish and an Ish”: a plate of Ricky’s delicious seafood plus the Fall 2014 issue of Southern Cultures. We regret to inform you that this event is sold out!

Fish and an Ish! Friday Fish Fry & Photo Exhibit, September 12 at 5:30 pm

Please join us at the Love House and Hutchins Forum for the opening reception of our fall art exhibit, “An Eye For Mullet,” co-sponsored by UNC Press and the Department of American Studies. These photographs, taken in a North Carolina mullet camp by Charles A. Farrell in 1938, were collected and curated by historian David S. Cecelski for an annotated photo essay that will (finally) appear in the Fall 2014 issue of Southern Cultures. “Our world today is so different than that of only a century ago,” writes Cecelski, “that few people can recognize even the most basic aspects of daily life and labor as seen in [these] photographs.” Yet the black-and-white images reveal “the changing nature of our relationship to the ocean and seashore.” You can listen to voices and stories from the Southern Oral History Program‘s “Coastal Carolina” series here.

Saltbox logoTo celebrate the issue’s release, we have invited Ricky Moore of Durham’s Saltbox Seafood Joint to serve up some of his signature sustainable seafood from the Carolina coast. We’ll also enjoy live music on the porch by Wayne Martin & Friends. The reception is free and open to the public, and $20 gets you “Fish and an Ish”: a plate of Ricky’s delicious seafood plus the Fall 2014 issue of Southern Cultures. We regret to inform you that this event is sold out!

“An Eye for Mullet”: Photographs by Charles A. Farrell / Text by David S. Cecelski

Our Fall 2014 Art @ the Center exhibit, co-sponsored by UNC Press and the Department of American Studies, features photographs from a seasonal mullet fishing camp at Brown’s Island in Onslow County, North Carolina. The photographs were taken in 1938 by Charles A. Farrell, to be published in a book that never quite made it to press. However, they will (finally!) appear in the Fall 2014 issue of Southern Cultures as an annotated photo essay by historian David S. Cecelski, who is working to bring a collection of Farrell’s photos to publication with UNC Press. “Our world today is so different than that of only a century ago,” writes Cecelski, “that few people can recognize even the most basic aspects of daily life and labor as seen in [these] photographs.” Yet the black-and-white images reveal “the changing nature of our relationship to the ocean and seashore.” You can listen to voices and stories from the Southern Oral History Program‘s “Coastal Carolina” series here.

Fish sliderJoin us for the exhibit’s opening reception on Friday, September 12, when we will enjoy sustainable Carolina seafood from Ricky Moore’s Saltbox Seafood Joint as well as live music on the porch by Wayne Martin & Friends. The reception is free and open to the public, but $20 gets you “Fish and an Ish”: a plate of Ricky’s delicious seafood and the special water issue of Southern Cultures. To purchase tickets, click here.