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Posts from the ‘Art @ the Center’ Category

Winter Issue Launch @ the Nasher, Thurs, Dec 15 at 6:00 pm

Join us in celebrating the Winter Issue of Southern Cultures at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Curator Trevor Schoonmaker will discuss the current exhibit, Southern Accent, with artists Jeff Whetstone and Stacy Lynn Waddell. Selections from Southern Accent and an earlier conversation with Schoonmaker, Whetstone, and Waddell are featured in the new issue.

Art Reception: The South in Color, Friday, Sept 16 at 5:30

Our Fall 2016 art exhibit features photographs from William Ferris’s latest book, The South in Color. Together with his two previous books, Give My Poor Heart Ease and The Storied South, The South in Color completes Ferris’s documentary trilogy on the South’s tumultuous twentieth century. Although color film was not commonly used by documentarians during the latter half of the twentieth century, Ferris found color to work in significant ways in the photographic journals he created of his world in all its permutations and surprises.

FerrisFerris writes, “These portraits are not of the region’s celebrities–such as Eudora Welty and B.B. King–whom I photographed and wrote about elsewhere. They are, rather, prison inmates, quilt makers, and roadside vendors, photographed as they went about their daily lives. Each person has a deep connection to the place in which she or he lives, and they share intimate ties to family and friends in those places.”

The reception will include light refreshments and a live performance by acclaimed jazz vocalist Yolanda Hall. This event, which is co-sponsored by UNC Press, is free and open to the public.

South_in_Color3

Art @ the Center: The South in Color

Our Fall 2016 art exhibit features photographs from William Ferris’s latest book, The South in Color. Together with his two previous books, Give My Poor Heart Ease and The Storied South, The South in Color completes Ferris’s documentary trilogy on the South’s tumultuous twentieth century. Although color film was not commonly used by documentarians during the latter half of the twentieth century, Ferris found color to work in significant ways in the photographic journals he created of his world in all its permutations and surprises.

FerrisFerris writes, “These portraits are not of the region’s celebrities–such as Eudora Welty and B.B. King–whom I photographed and wrote about elsewhere. They are, rather, prison inmates, quilt makers, and roadside vendors, photographed as they went about their daily lives. Each person has a deep connection to the place in which she or he lives, and they share intimate ties to family and friends in those places.”

The reception will include light refreshments and a live performance by acclaimed jazz vocalist Yolanda Hall. This event, which is co-sponsored by UNC Press, is free and open to the public.

South_in_Color3

Southern Impressions Exhibit at NC Museum of History

Southern Impressions

A remarkable collection of paintings by native-born and visiting artists is now on display at the North Carolina Museum of History. These paintings, on loan from the collection of Dr. Everette James and Dr. Nancy Farmer, showcase southern landscapes, folkways, and lifestyles from the 1820s through the 1950s. “The artists convey the beauty—and the harsh realities—of the region’s history,” said curator Michael Ausbon.

Admission to the museum is free and open to the public. You can read more about the Southern Impressions exhibit here.

“Rostros del Tiempo, Faces of Time” Exhibition

This fall the Center is honored to showcase a photography collection titled “Rostros del Tiempo: Faces of Time.” Photographed by Charles D. Thompson, Jr., these portraits depict the faces of former Braceros (or their widows, who stand for them) who once worked in U.S. fields, harvesting crops and providing food for American consumers from 1942-1964. These elderly men and women gather every Sunday in Ciudad Juarez to protest because they still have not received the retirement benefits they earned half a century ago. Thompson’s photographs represent thousands more ex-Braceros near Ciudad Juarez and elsewhere in Mexico and the U.S., including those not pictured and those already passed on–as well as workers everywhere whose pay has been shortchanged.

BorderMap
Read about the Braceros in Thompson’s book, Border Odyssey (University of Texas Press, 2015), or view a short film about the Border Odyssey project here.
You can also listen to a curated audio playlist about the immigrant experience produced by the Southern Oral History Program here.

The exhibition is on view at the Center through the fall.