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McColl Fellows and Summer Research Grant Recipients for 2013-2014

The Center is pleased to award fourteen graduate and undergraduate research grants and fellowships for research projects on a full range of topics that address the U.S. South in all its diversities and complexities.

Our ten Summer Research Grant recipients, who come from the departments of Folklore, History, Nutrition, Political Science, and Religious Studies, are already hard at work on their projects. They will continue to meet as the Southern Research Circle working group throughout the coming academic year, bridging departments with conversations, workshops, and programs designed to foster interdisciplinary thinking and support for research on the South. Read more about their amazing projects below. The Summer Research Grants were funded through the generosity of Olivia Delacruz.

Two graduate students were awarded McColl Dissertation Fellowships this year, one for completion of a dissertation, and one to begin the research stages of a dissertation.  Both projects promise to be major contributions to the discourse of southern studies, and support emerging scholars with impressive profiles and trajectories.  Read more about their topics of research below. These fellowships are funded by an endowment from Hugh McColl.

Two additional awards have further expanded the Center’s support of student research this year.  Undergraduate student Irene Newman received the Frances Ferris Hall award to support her honors thesis research into the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.  Graduate student Ryan Comfort received a special grant to support a photojournalism project addressing the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians; this work will be integrated into undergraduate courses and study-abroad opportunities now in various planning stages.

All of these innovative, creative, and insightful projects will be presented in full and celebrated at a public poster session at the Center next fall.

The Center for the Study of the American South has a vital mission to foster the work of emerging scholars and to facilitate the interdisciplinary connections that yield the most insightful work on the South.  We are proud of these remarkable students and the work they are doing, and we invite you to join us by supporting these grants and fellowships for future years.

McColl Dissertation Year Fellow

Joey Fink “The Many Norma Raes: Working-Class Women in the Struggle to Organize J.P. Stevens in the 1970s”

Joey Fink
“The Many Norma Raes: Working-Class Women in the Struggle to Organize J.P. Stevens in the 1970s”

Joey Fink is a PhD candidate in the Department of History. Her dissertation combines oral history and archival research to explore the connections between labor struggles, the women’s movement, and civil rights activism in the 1970s South. Joey has taught courses in oral history, U.S. business history, and women’s history, and coordinated the SOHP undergraduate internship program in its first year.

 

McColl Early-Stage Research Fellow

Vincent Joos "Creating Diasporic Spaces in the Rural South: Adaptation and Acculturation among Haitian Migrants in Mount Olive, NC"

Vincent Joos
“Creating Diasporic Spaces in the Rural South: Adaptation and Acculturation among Haitian Migrants in Mount Olive, NC”

Vincent Joos is a French native who earned his MA in Folklore at UNC-Chapel Hill (2010) on African American memory, history, and expressive culture in Natchez, Mississippi. He is presently a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology, conducting fieldwork that explores the relations between Haitian migrants and African Americans in the coastal plains of North Carolina.

 

Summer Research Grant Recipients

Danielle Braxton “Spirituality, Soul Food, and Social Support: An Investigation into the Coping Mechanisms used by Southern African American Women in Response to Racism”

Danielle Braxton
“Spirituality, Soul Food, and Social Support: An Investigation into the Coping Mechanisms Used by Southern African American Women in Response to Racism”

Danielle Braxton MPH, RD, LDN is a third-year doctoral student in the Nutrition Department. Danielle is originally from Greenville, NC, and her primary research interest is understanding the roles of culture and stress in weight-related health behaviors among southern African American women.

 

Elizabeth Ellis "'Altho You are but few in Numbers': The Petite Nations in the Lower Mississippi River Valley from the Natchez Wars through the Louisiana Purchase"

Elizabeth Ellis
“‘Altho You are but few in Numbers’: The Petite Nations in the Lower Mississippi River Valley from the Natchez Wars through the Louisiana Purchase”

Elizabeth Ellis is originally from New York and attended Tulane University, where she began studying small Indian nations along the Gulf Coast. Three years ago, she came to UNC to continue her research and pursue a PhD in American History. Her dissertation explores the experiences of the small Indian polities of the Lower Mississippi Valley during the eighteenth century and these “petites nations’” ties to the global southeast.

 

T. Evan Faulkenbury
“The South in a Thousand Pieces: The Voter Education Project and the Financing of the Civil Rights Movement”

T. Evan Faulkenbury is completing his first year as a PhD candidate in the Department of History. Hailing from Concord, North Carolina, Evan’s research focuses on the financing of the Civil Rights Movement.

 

Stephanie Gaskill "Forgiveness or Redemption?: Religion and Race in Southern Criminal Justice since the Punitive Turn"

Stephanie Gaskill
“Forgiveness or Redemption?: Religion and Race in Southern Criminal Justice Since the Punitive Turn”

Stephanie Gaskill is a third-year PhD student in Religious Studies from Toledo, Ohio. Her research focuses on the way the criminal justice system in Louisiana reveals the continuing relationship between religion and race in the post-Civil Rights era South.

 

Sarah McNamara "From Labor Feminism to Civil Rights: Latina Women and the Remaking of Ybor City in the Jim Crow South, 1930-1964"

Sarah McNamara
“From Labor Feminism to Civil Rights: Latina Women and the Remaking of Ybor City in the Jim Crow South, 1930-1964″

Sarah McNamara, originally from Tampa, Florida, is a third-year graduate student in the Department of History. Sarah studies U.S. History with a focus on Latina/o Studies, Labor, and Women and Gender.

 

Kelsey Michael "Meanings of Place in a Southern Suburb: An Ethnographic Examination of Hope Valley"

Kelsey Michael
“Meanings of Place in a Southern Suburb: An Ethnographic Examination of Hope Valley”

From Florence, Alabama, Kelsey Michael is a master’s candidate in Folklore . Her research considers the construction of a sense of place in southern suburbs.

 

Jeanine Navarette "'See it Like a Native': Race and the Politics of Latino Immigration to Miami, 1965-1980"

Jeanine Navarrete
“‘See it Like a Native’: Race and the Politics of Latino Immigration to Miami, 1965-1980″

Jeanine Navarrete is a native of Miami, Florida, and a rising third-year PhD student in U.S. History. Her doctoral research focuses on immigration and urban Latino communities in the post-WWII South. She received her BA in American Studies from Wellesley College.

 

Jacob Smith "The Case of the Non-existent Marginals: Explaining Competition in Southern Congressional Elections, 1964-Present"

Jacob Smith
“The Case of the Non-existent Marginals: Explaining Competition in Southern Congressional Elections, 1964-Present”

Jacob Smith is a first-year PhD student in the Department of Political Science. Jacob is originally from Clinton, Ohio, and studies congressional elections, political parties, and Congress.

 

Thayne Photo

Stanley Thayne
“Catawbas East and West: Land, Migration, and the Contours of Citizenship”

Stanley Thayne is a graduate student in the Department of Religious Studies. His research interests include Indigenous Christianities and American Indian nationalism and focuses specifically on the Catawba Nation.

 

Mishio Yamanaka  "The Long Road to Plessy: The Racial Integration Movement of Creoles of Color in New Orleans, 1862-1896"

Mishio Yamanaka
“The Long Road to Plessy: The Racial Integration Movement of Creoles of Color in New Orleans, 1862-1896″

Mishio Yamanaka is a second-year PhD student in U.S. History from Toyota, Japan. Her field is the late-nineteenth-century U.S. South with a particular focus on race and ethnic relations in Louisiana.

Irene Newman

Irene Newman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irene Newman is a senior from Charlottesville, VA pursuing a double major in American Studies and Peace, War & Defense with a minor in Creative Writing.  She is currently writing an honors thesis in American Studies on the 1963 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, and her research focuses on how the legacies of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley have affected the collective memory of the event over time.
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